The wave nature of the wave function.

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The "wave nature" of the wave function.

Let's say an electron has a certain wave function in two dimentions, and a proton or electron travels through it (the wavefunction).

Will the wavefunction of the electron experience "wave effects" like if one drove a piece of wood through a body of water? (though a liquid of high viscosity might be a better example then wood) or does it intantly return to its state before the appearance of the proton/electron?
 

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  • #2
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Let's say an electron has a certain wave function in two dimentions, and a proton or electron travels through it (the wavefunction).

Will the wavefunction of the electron experience "wave effects" like if one drove a piece of wood through a body of water? (though a liquid of high viscosity might be a better example then wood) or does it intantly return to its state before the appearance of the proton/electron?

Yes, the interaction wll give rise to a scattering term that can be treated in various approximations (e.g. Born approximation or partial wave series).
 
  • #3
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After they are separated, wave packets of two particles will just have a form according to the energy-momentum they have due to the interaction. When wavepackets overlap, those of identical particles become a single wavefunction in which one particle can't be distinguished from another. But wavefunctions are not like a substance that have ripples because something passed through it.
 
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I understand. Thanks for your help. :)
 

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