Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

The wave nature of the wave function.

  1. Oct 13, 2009 #1
    The "wave nature" of the wave function.

    Let's say an electron has a certain wave function in two dimentions, and a proton or electron travels through it (the wavefunction).

    Will the wavefunction of the electron experience "wave effects" like if one drove a piece of wood through a body of water? (though a liquid of high viscosity might be a better example then wood) or does it intantly return to its state before the appearance of the proton/electron?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 13, 2009 #2
    Re: The "wave nature" of the wave function.

    Yes, the interaction wll give rise to a scattering term that can be treated in various approximations (e.g. Born approximation or partial wave series).
     
  4. Oct 13, 2009 #3
    Re: The "wave nature" of the wave function.

    After they are separated, wave packets of two particles will just have a form according to the energy-momentum they have due to the interaction. When wavepackets overlap, those of identical particles become a single wavefunction in which one particle can't be distinguished from another. But wavefunctions are not like a substance that have ripples because something passed through it.
     
  5. Oct 13, 2009 #4
    Re: The "wave nature" of the wave function.

    I understand. Thanks for your help. :)
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook




Similar Discussions: The wave nature of the wave function.
  1. Wave function (Replies: 5)

  2. Wave function (Replies: 5)

  3. Wave function (Replies: 2)

  4. +/- wave function (Replies: 5)

Loading...