The way we write ln(x) to the power of a

  • Thread starter johann1301
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  • #1
johann1301
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I have learned that (cos x)a can be written as cosax. And like wise for sin x and tan x.

How come we don't write (ln x)a as lnax or (log x)a as logax?

I just think it seems smarter when its written with as few symbols as possible.

(Or perhaps its just my textbook which don't write it this way?)

Thanks in advance!
 

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  • #2
arildno
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LOTS of textbooks use that convention. I will go as far as to say it is the most common convention. :smile:
 
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  • #3
Mentallic
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Personally, I hardly ever see logs with powers (except in a couple of circumstances), while trigs with powers (especially squared) are a common occurrence.
 
  • #4
Office_Shredder
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My advisor has gone so far as to tell me when I square any function I should write it as f2(x), which I personally don't like but what am I going to do about it (I would rather write f(x)2). I will admit that it makes the final writeup a little cleaner looking
 
  • #5
eigenperson
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The notation fa(x) is a little bit ambiguous because it can mean either f(x)a or f(f(...f(x)...)).

You can usually work out the meaning from context. If f is a trig function, you are probably okay, since in most situations it does not make sense to iterate the sine function. But both log(log(x)) and (log(x))2 are potentially useful things.
 

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