Titration - Calculating the endpoint

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In summary, the conversation discusses a titration of 25 ml of 0.1M NaOH with 25 ml of 0.1M HCl and the calculation of the expected endpoint. It is mentioned that the volume of the initial solution would be equal to the volume of the titrant, and for calculating the pH at the endpoint, a formula is needed. The conversation also mentions a resource for calculating acid/base titration curve.
  • #1
future_vet
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Hello,

I have titrated 25 ml of NaOH with 25 ml of HCl. Both are 0.1M.
I need to calculate the expected endpoint for the titration of the strong base with the strong acid.

I know that:
0.025 L x 0.1M = 2.5 x 10^-3 moles of NaOH and HCl each.
I know that I need the same volume of both to do the titration.

But what I don't understand is: how do I calculate the endpoint? What is it supposed to be, a mole amount, a M amount, a volume, a pH?...

Thank you,

J.
 
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  • #2
Question is ambiguous for me. You are asked either about volume of titrant or about pH.
 
  • #3
That's what I thought too...

So, if it is the volume of titrant, since the 2 chemicals have the same molarity, the volume of the initial solution would be equal to the volume of the titrant. So, if they ask for the volume, I can do it.

What if I have to calculate the pH at the endpoint? I know how to predict whether it will be above at or below 7.0 depending on what we start with and what the titrant is, but I am not sure what the formula is to find the exact pH...

Any idea?

Thank you!
 
  • #4
Is this an actuall reaction you are doing or just on paper? In the past all titrations I've done have been volume based.
 
  • #5

Related to Titration - Calculating the endpoint

1. What is titration?

Titration is a laboratory process used to determine the concentration of an unknown solution by reacting it with a known solution. It involves measuring the volume of the known solution needed to completely react with the unknown solution.

2. How do you calculate the endpoint in titration?

The endpoint in titration is the point at which the reaction between the two solutions is complete. It can be calculated by adding the known solution to the unknown solution drop by drop until the indicator shows a color change, indicating the endpoint has been reached.

3. Why is it important to find the endpoint in titration?

Finding the endpoint in titration is important because it allows for accurate determination of the concentration of the unknown solution. Without reaching the endpoint, the titration results may be inaccurate and lead to incorrect conclusions.

4. How do you know when you have reached the endpoint in titration?

The endpoint in titration can be identified by using an indicator, such as a pH indicator or a color-changing indicator, which changes color when the reaction is complete. The endpoint is typically reached when the color change is permanent, and does not change with further addition of the known solution.

5. What factors can affect the accuracy of titration results?

There are several factors that can affect the accuracy of titration results, including human error in measuring the volume of solutions, incorrect calibration of equipment, and impurities in the solutions. It is important to carefully follow the titration procedure and use high-quality reagents to minimize potential errors.

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