What Volume of NaOH is Required for Back Titration in Simple Back Titration?

  • Thread starter Krushnaraj Pandya
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In summary, 20 ml of decinormal HCl solution was mixed with 10 ml of decinormal AgNO3 solution, resulting in the precipitation of AgCl. The excess HCl was then back titrated against a decinormal NaOH solution. It is unclear how much NaOH was required for the back titration due to the presence of HNO3.
  • #1
Krushnaraj Pandya
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Homework Statement


20 ml of decinormal HCl soln. is added to 10 ml decinormal AgNO3 soln. AgCl is precipitated out and excess of acid was back titrated against a decinormal NaOH soln., What volume of NaOH was required for the back titration?

2. The attempt at a solution
10 ml HCl reacts with 10 ml AgNO3. 10 ml HCl is left. Now Do we consider HNO3 formed also, since then it'd require 20 ml NaOH. If we consider only HCl it'd be 10
 
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  • #2
It hardly counts as a back titration, you are perfectly right that all H+ present initially have to be neutralized (which means there is no way of checking how much Ag+ was present).
 
  • #3
Borek said:
It hardly counts as a back titration, you are perfectly right that all H+ present initially have to be neutralized (which means there is no way of checking how much Ag+ was present).
Ah! alright, thank you
 

Related to What Volume of NaOH is Required for Back Titration in Simple Back Titration?

1. What is a simple back titration?

A simple back titration is a type of chemical analysis that is used to determine the amount of a substance in a solution by reacting it with an excess of another substance, and then determining the amount of the excess substance that remains after the reaction is complete.

2. When is a simple back titration used?

A simple back titration is typically used when the substance being analyzed cannot be directly titrated, or when the reaction between the two substances is too slow or incomplete to be accurately measured.

3. How does a simple back titration work?

In a simple back titration, a known amount of the substance being analyzed is reacted with an excess of another substance. The excess substance is then titrated with a third substance until it is completely neutralized. The amount of the excess substance that remains after the reaction is complete is then used to calculate the amount of the original substance present in the solution.

4. What are the advantages of using a simple back titration?

One advantage of using a simple back titration is that it can be used for substances that are insoluble or difficult to dissolve. It also allows for a more accurate determination of the original substance, as the reaction between the two substances is allowed to go to completion.

5. Are there any limitations to using a simple back titration?

One limitation of using a simple back titration is that it is a time-consuming process. It also requires a significant amount of calculations and careful measurements, which can introduce sources of error. Additionally, it may not be suitable for substances that react slowly or for substances with multiple components in the solution.

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