Titration from basic end point to acid endpoint

In summary, the conversation discusses titration and the components of an acetate solution. It also mentions the amount of acid required to titrate the solution and the reactions that take place during titration.
  • #1
madgab89
22
0

Homework Statement




If you started at the basic end-point and titrated acetate solution to the acid end point, how much acid would be required?

Our acetate solution was:
1 mL of 0.1 M acetic acid
1 mL of 0.1 M acetate
8 mL of water
total volume: 10 mL

Titration with 0.1 M HCl
0.90 mL added at color change

Titration with 0.1 M NaOH
1.1 mL added at color change

I have no idea even where to start.. ?
 
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  • #2
You can't start titration at the end point. End point is where you END titration.

What reaction takes place during titration? Can you write balanced reaction equation?

--
www.titrations.info - all about titration methods
 
  • #3



I would first determine the initial and final pH of the solution at the basic and acid endpoints. This information would help me calculate the amount of acid needed to reach the acid endpoint. To do this, I would use the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation, which relates the pH of a solution to the pKa (acid dissociation constant) of the acid being titrated and the ratio of the concentrations of the conjugate base and acid.

Next, I would use the volume of acid added at the color change (0.9 mL) to calculate the moles of acid added. Since the concentration of the acid being titrated is 0.1 M, the moles of acid added would be 0.00009 moles.

From there, I would use the stoichiometry of the acid-base reaction to determine the amount of acid needed to reach the acid endpoint. In this case, since the acid being titrated is acetic acid, the reaction would be:

CH3COOH + HCl -> CH3COOH2Cl

Based on the balanced equation, for every 1 mole of HCl added, 1 mole of acetic acid reacts. Therefore, the amount of acid needed to reach the acid endpoint would also be 0.00009 moles.

In conclusion, based on the given information, approximately 0.00009 moles of acid would be required to titrate the acetate solution from the basic to the acid endpoint.
 

Related to Titration from basic end point to acid endpoint

1. What is titration from basic endpoint to acid endpoint?

Titration from basic endpoint to acid endpoint is a laboratory technique used to determine the concentration of an unknown acid or base solution. It involves adding a known concentration of an acid or base solution to the unknown solution until the reaction reaches its endpoint, which is when the solution changes color. This allows for the calculation of the unknown solution's concentration.

2. How do I know when I have reached the endpoint?

The endpoint is reached when the solution changes color. This color change is typically detected using an indicator, a substance that changes color when the pH of the solution reaches a certain value. Common indicators used in titration include phenolphthalein, methyl orange, and bromothymol blue.

3. What is the difference between the basic and acid endpoint?

The basic endpoint is the point at which the solution changes from acidic to basic, while the acid endpoint is the point at which the solution changes from basic to acidic. This difference is important because it determines which indicator is used in the titration and can affect the accuracy of the results.

4. How do I calculate the concentration of the unknown solution?

To calculate the concentration of the unknown solution, you will need to use the volume and concentration of the known solution, as well as the volume of the unknown solution used in the titration. This can be done using the formula M1V1 = M2V2, where M1 is the concentration of the known solution, V1 is the volume of the known solution used, M2 is the concentration of the unknown solution, and V2 is the volume of the unknown solution used.

5. What are some sources of error in titration from basic endpoint to acid endpoint?

Some sources of error in titration include inaccurate measurements of volume or concentration, improper handling of the equipment, and not allowing enough time for the solution to mix before recording the endpoint. It is important to carefully follow the procedure and make multiple trials to minimize these sources of error and obtain accurate results.

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