Tonga eruption shockwave and weather station(s) in Poland

In summary, a weather enthusiast recently noticed a spike in pressure on his weather station, which he later realized was caused by a shock wave from an eruption in South America. He and others in his bubble of weather stations in Poland were able to observe the wave as it traveled around the world, with the second spike appearing in the opposite direction. The speed of the wave seems to be consistent with the speed of sound at high altitudes. The change in pressure can be explained by the displacement of air in a shrinking and growing circle.
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Borek
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Warsaw times, subtract 1 hour for GMT.

It was pointed to me yesterday that we should see these by the same guy that sends helium filled balloons around the world (his latest is in the air for about half a year now), I posted about him some time ago. He posted an image from his weather station yesterday, showing the first spike, so I checked mine - and it was visible as well. Turned out many more people in his bubble have weather stations reporting/registering pressures so there is a bunch of observations from around Poland, probably enough to even do some crude triangulation. We quickly realized that the wave should be visible again several hours later, once it travels around the world in other direction. It was the first thing I checked in the morning - and yes, it is there. But reversed - which I don't get. Any ideas about physics behind? Something happened when the waves converged on the eruption antipodes?

Some input data for analysis if you are interested: eruption time GMT 4:10 (5:10 my time), approximate eruption coordinates: 20.5°S 75.4°W, my coordinates: 52.3°N 21.1°E - around 16200 km. First spike arrived to me at around 20:05-20:06 (I have one minute resolution) and the second one around 2:51-2:52.

obraz_2022-01-16_100321.png


(and if anyone is interested in more plots - comments and discussion are in Polish, but the images are universal ;) )

 
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My thoughts on the change in pressure:

The shock wave is equivalent to suddenly shifting a mass of air forward along a circular front. The transient changes in pressure will be large but will average out. However, as the location is more than half way round the world from the source, the first shock wave will be displacing that air in a shrinking circle, but the second will be displacing that air in a growing circle. So the overall effect will be to temporarily increase the pressure the first time and temporarily decrease it the second.
 
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1. What caused the Tonga eruption shockwave?

The Tonga eruption shockwave was caused by a volcanic explosion on the island of Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha'apai in Tonga on January 15, 2022. The explosion was estimated to be equivalent to a magnitude 5.8 earthquake and was powerful enough to be detected by satellites in space.

2. How far did the Tonga eruption shockwave travel?

The shockwave from the Tonga eruption traveled over 10,000 kilometers, reaching as far as South America and even impacting weather patterns in Europe. It was one of the longest recorded shockwaves from a volcanic explosion.

3. What is the significance of the weather station(s) in Poland in relation to the Tonga eruption shockwave?

The weather station(s) in Poland were able to detect the shockwave from the Tonga eruption due to its sensitive equipment and location. This data is important for understanding the impact of the eruption on global weather patterns and for predicting future volcanic events.

4. How did the Tonga eruption shockwave affect weather patterns in Europe?

The Tonga eruption shockwave caused disruptions in weather patterns in Europe, particularly in the North Atlantic region. It led to changes in air pressure and wind patterns, resulting in colder temperatures and increased storm activity in some areas.

5. Are there any long-term effects of the Tonga eruption shockwave on the weather?

It is possible that the Tonga eruption shockwave could have some long-term effects on weather patterns, particularly in the North Atlantic region. The shockwave may have disrupted the normal flow of the jet stream, which could lead to more extreme weather events in the future. However, more research is needed to fully understand the long-term impacts.

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