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Top physicists of all time with respect to h-index

  1. Jul 22, 2009 #1
    Hi, I've been searching google for like an hour now and I can't seem to find a compiled lists of the top physicists of all time with respect to h-index (I'd like like top 100 but I'd settle for top 10). You'd think it'd be easy to find but I can't seem to find such a list. Does anyone know where one might be? Help is greatly appreciated.

    P.S. I'd prefer this didn't turn into a discussion of the short comings of the h-index as a metric of success. I'm just looking for a list.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 22, 2009 #2
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 24, 2017
  4. Jul 22, 2009 #3
  5. Jul 22, 2009 #4
    Re: H-index

    It's one of the short comings of the h-index as a metric of success. :smile:
     
  6. Jul 22, 2009 #5
    Re: H-index

    I'm more inclined to say the stats are wrong. Feynman didn't publish a lot so I get his low value but I was always under the impression that Dirac published quite a bit (and surely most of his papers were cited many, many times). I mean Dirac probably has more than 19 things NAMED AFTER HIM so surely each of those would have been in a highly cited paper.
     
  7. Jul 22, 2009 #6
    Re: H-index

    Haha! Feynman = pwned by Brian Greene. Just goes to show you what really matters: publishing a lot and getting cited even more. :tongue2:
     
  8. Jul 22, 2009 #7
    Re: H-index

    Being cited in a paper doesn't mean you had anything useful to contribute..a lot of really terrible papers get high citations just because they did were the first to approach a particular problem, so all the new and better approaches end up listing this terrible approach in their previous work section.

    I think a better measure of a person's influence is measured by the prevalence of their name in the archives of the world. Thus I present the G-index,

    Dirac = 2,960,000
    Feynman = 2,520,000
    James Maxwell = 2,260,000
    Brian Greene = 338,000
     
  9. Jul 22, 2009 #8
    Re: H-index

    I found this out the hard way. I have an h-index of 93 because of all the papers citing my papers and saying "don't do it this way".
     
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