Transferring to a new university

In summary, my mother had a talk with me about a potential emigration to another country, job stuff. I've had a look at the universities' websites and it seems that they follow the American system, or perhaps British, i.e B.Sc B.A etc, which is not the case where I live. We're following the french guys. Currently I'm in a "classe préparatoire" of which there exists two types, for the first I'll quote Wikipedia :"The "classes préparatoires aux grandes écoles (CPGE)" (English: Higher School
  • #1
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Hey guys, my mother had a talk with me about a potential emigration to another country, job stuff.
I've had a look at the universities' websites and it seems that they follow the American system, or perhaps British, i.e B.Sc B.A etc, which is not the case where I live. We're following the french guys.
Currently I'm in a "classe préparatoire" of which there exists two types, for the first I'll quote Wikipedia :

"The "classes préparatoires aux grandes écoles (CPGE)" (English: Higher School Preparatory Classes), commonly called classes prépas or prépas, are part of the French post-secondary education system. They consist of two years of study (extendable to three or exceptionally four years) which act as a preparatory course (or cram school) with the main goal of training students for enrollment in one of the grandes écoles. The workload is one of the highest in Europe[1] (29 to 45 contact hours a week, with up to 10 hours of guided tutorials and oral exam sessions)."

The second is "prépa integrée" which means that I do the two years of "prépa" in **the same university I'm going to continue my studies in** and from this fact arises my question : Will I need to start from first year if I tranfer to a new university?<br>
And do universities, in general, accept students of other education systems from year 2+?<br>

The target country is Qatar, I've seen that there are branches of American universities there like Texas A&M and Carnegie Mellon, does anyone have an idea if they provide the same quality of education offered at the main campus?

In the institution I'm currently in, we do two years of "prépa" followed by 3 years of "cycle ingénieur" which is a postgraduate degree in engineering, but when I checked the curriculum of T A&M and C Mellon they're offering 4 years of B.Sc (in the field I'm interested in), is that equivalent to the "cycle ingénieur"?
 
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Can I ask how old you are?

I'm familiar with British universities. They normally take students at age 18 and they graduate with a BSc after 3 years or an MEng after 4 years. Either will get you a good job/career in engineering. Some people go on to do an MSc or Phd but that not essential, unless you want a career in academia.

Most countries consider you to be an adult at age 18 so it wouldn't normally be necessary to emigrate with your parents once you have started a course at a British University.

So my guess is you are 16-17?
 
  • #3
CWatters said:
Can I ask how old you are?

I'm familiar with British universities. They normally take students at age 18 and they graduate with a BSc after 3 years or an MEng after 4 years. Either will get you a good job/career in engineering. Some people go on to do an MSc or Phd but that not essential, unless you want a career in academia.

Most countries consider you to be an adult at age 18 so it wouldn't normally be necessary to emigrate with your parents once you have started a course at a British University.

So my guess is you are 16-17?
Thank you for your answer!
I'm 19, moving with the mother, job stuff, edited the post.
 
  • #4
I can understand why your mother is moving for work reasons but why do you have to go as well? Most people at British Universities live independent lives to their parents. I left home age 18 when I went away to university.
 
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CWatters said:
I can understand why your mother is moving for work reasons but why do you have to go as well? Most people at British Universities live independent lives to their parents. I left home age 18 when I went away to university.
Can't let her live alone ^^'
 
  • #6
OK.

At 19 you would normally be 1 year into a British university degree course. Some British universities run nonspecialist first year courses. For example in engineering they cover the maths, physics and perhaps chemistry needed for all of their engineering degrees. Then in the second year you can choose which branch of engineering (major in the USA) you are interested in. I think many other non engineering courses are similar.

So I think you would need to contact a target university, explain your situation and ask about the possibility of entry into the second year. Find out what information they require your current university to provide.
 
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  • #7
CWatters said:
OK.

At 19 you would normally be 1 year into a British university degree course. Some British universities run nonspecialist first year courses. For example in engineering they cover the maths, physics and perhaps chemistry needed for all of their engineering degrees. Then in the second year you can choose which branch of engineering (major in the USA) you are interested in. I think many other non engineering courses are similar.

So I think you would need to contact a target university, explain your situation and ask about the possibility of entry into the second year. Find out what information they require your current university to provide.
Bless you!
 

1. How do I transfer to a new university?

The first step to transferring to a new university is to research the transfer requirements and application process for the specific university you are interested in. You may need to submit transcripts, essays, letters of recommendation, and other materials. It is important to also meet with an academic advisor to ensure that you are on track to meet all the necessary requirements for transfer.

2. Can I transfer my credits to a new university?

In most cases, you can transfer credits from your previous university to your new university. However, the amount of credits that will transfer and count towards your degree will vary depending on the policies of the new university. It is important to research this information beforehand and consult with an academic advisor.

3. Will transferring to a new university affect my graduation timeline?

Transferring to a new university may affect your graduation timeline, as the new university may have different course requirements and credit transfer policies. It is important to work closely with an academic advisor to create a plan that ensures you will still be able to graduate on time.

4. Can I transfer to a new university if I am on academic probation?

It is possible to transfer to a new university while on academic probation, but it may affect your admission chances. Some universities may require you to complete a certain number of credits or achieve a certain GPA before transferring. It is important to research the policies of the new university and speak with an academic advisor about your options.

5. Are there any benefits to transferring to a new university?

Transferring to a new university can have several benefits, such as gaining access to new academic programs and opportunities, experiencing a new campus and community, and potentially saving money on tuition. It can also provide a fresh start and new opportunities for personal and academic growth. However, it is important to carefully consider the reasons for transferring and ensure that it aligns with your academic and career goals.

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