Unraveling a Confusing Algebra Problem: My Step-by-Step Solution

In summary, the conversation discusses a problem involving measuring time in days and months. The speaker gives a suggestion about making things easier by using months instead of days. They also mention that the statement is missing information about the x's. The speaker also notes that there are rhetorical questions in the problem and asks about the instructor's policy on commenting on them. The person involved in the conversation states that they have not been provided with additional information and that they are supposed to comment on the questions. They also clarify that the x's in the equations refer to the date in the month and provide an example. The speaker then realizes that they made a mistake and corrects themselves. The conversation ends with the speaker asking for clarification on the March equation.
  • #1
t3rom
54
0
Homework Statement
Please see attached pictures for the confusing algebra problem
Relevant Equations
y = mx+b
m = y2-y1/x2-x1
This is the question:
question.png


This is what I did. I have no other idea what else I can do to solve this confusing problem.
FB237787-1A28-4041-9144-D806B7C5583C.jpeg


F162DF34-9ED0-4F9A-B280-2A4DACF794C1.jpeg
 
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  • #2
My first comment is that you are making things hard for yourself by measuring time in days instead of months.

That said, all you are missing is a statement about what your x's are. For the January formula, 'x' is ...

Also, I notice that the problem statement has several questions. Most seem to be rhetorical. But what is your instructors policy on those kind of question? Are you supposed to comment on them?
 
  • #3
.Scott said:
My first comment is that you are making things hard for yourself by measuring time in days instead of months.

That said, all you are missing is a statement about what your x's are. For the January formula, 'x' is ...

Also, I notice that the problem statement has several questions. Most seem to be rhetorical. But what is your instructors policy on those kind of question? Are you supposed to comment on them?

I haven't been proved with more information other than the given one. And yes, I am supposed to comment on them.
 
  • #4
I think you meant "provided", not "proved" - and I didn't think that you were provided anything else specific to this problem. But the 'x's in your equations refer to the date in the month. Since the three months are different, I would note (for example) that for the January function, x is the date in January.
 
Last edited:
  • #5
.Scott said:
I think you meant "provided", not "proved" - and I didn't think that you were provided anything else specific to this problem. But the 'x's in your equations refer to the date in the month. Since the three months are different, I would note (for example) that for the January function, x is the date in January.

And: Your March equation is wrong.

Yeah, sorry that was a typo. Can you let me know what my March equation is supposed to be? I'm very confused with this question to be honest.
 
  • #6
Actually - it is right. I misread the problem when I reread it.
 

Related to Unraveling a Confusing Algebra Problem: My Step-by-Step Solution

1. How do I start unraveling a confusing algebra problem?

To start unraveling a confusing algebra problem, it is important to first read and understand the problem carefully. Identify the given information and what is being asked. Then, try to simplify the problem by combining like terms or using the distributive property. If you are still stuck, try working backwards from the answer to see if it makes sense.

2. What are the key steps to solving an algebra problem?

The key steps to solving an algebra problem are: 1) Identify the given information and what is being asked; 2) Simplify the problem by combining like terms or using the distributive property; 3) Solve for the variable by isolating it on one side of the equation; 4) Check your solution by plugging it back into the original problem; and 5) Write your answer in a clear and organized manner.

3. How do I know if my solution to an algebra problem is correct?

To check if your solution to an algebra problem is correct, plug the solution back into the original problem and see if it satisfies the equation. If it does, then your solution is most likely correct. You can also use a calculator to check your work or ask a classmate or teacher for feedback.

4. What should I do if I get stuck on a step while solving an algebra problem?

If you get stuck on a step while solving an algebra problem, take a break and come back to it later with a fresh mind. You can also try looking for similar examples or asking a classmate or teacher for help. Sometimes, approaching the problem from a different angle can also help you understand it better.

5. How can I improve my algebra problem-solving skills?

To improve your algebra problem-solving skills, practice regularly and seek help when needed. Make sure to understand the concepts and formulas rather than just memorizing them. You can also try solving more challenging problems and breaking them down into smaller, manageable steps. Additionally, using online resources or working with a tutor can also help you improve your skills.

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