Vectors are confusing me. I'm not sure if I'm doing it right

  • Thread starter josh12399
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  • #1
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Homework Statement


Charge q1 = +8.36 μC is fixed at the origin and charge q2 = -4.28μC is fixed on the +x-axis, 0.371m from the origin.

(a) Find the direction and magnitude of the electric field at a point P that has coordinates (0.466, 0.466) m.

(b) Find the direction and magnitude of the force on a -2.00 μC charge placed at the point P. (Please state the direction as an angle measured counterclockwise from the positive x-axis.)

Homework Equations


E = Kq/r^2

The Attempt at a Solution



Find θ1 = atan(0.466/0.466) = 45 degrees
θ2 = atan(0.466/0.095) = 78.48 degrees

I figured you just add the two vectors. For some reason I dont know how to... What is confusing me is that a can't use -4.28μC, for example, as the actual value. I think I need to use E=kq/r2 Here's what the diagram looks like

I really appreciate any help


EDIT:

I got the first part. It is attached
Would the second part just be F=Eq?

[/B]
 

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Answers and Replies

  • #2
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You should review this as its important.

Bascially convert the two vectors into components along the x and y axis and go from there.
 
  • #3
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You should review this as its important.

Bascially convert the two vectors into components along the x and y axis and go from there.
But what values should I be using?
 
  • #4
SammyS
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Homework Statement


Charge q1 = +8.36 μC is fixed at the origin and charge q2 = -4.28μC is fixed on the +x-axis, 0.371m from the origin.

(a) Find the direction and magnitude of the electric field at a point P that has coordinates (0.466, 0.466) m.

(b) Find the direction and magnitude of the force on a -2.00 μC charge placed at the point P. (Please state the direction as an angle measured counterclockwise from the positive x-axis.)

Homework Equations


E = Kq/r^2

The Attempt at a Solution



Find θ1 = atan(0.466/0.466) = 45 degrees
θ2 = atan(0.466/0.095) = 78.48 degrees

I figured you just add the two vectors. For some reason I dont know how to... What is confusing me is that a can't use -4.28μC, for example, as the actual value. I think I need to use E=kq/r2 Here's what the diagram looks like

I really appreciate any help
[/B]
Hello josh12399 . Welcome to PF .

upload_2016-7-17_20-51-58.png


The resultant you have for E1 + E2 looks to be correct providing that you used correct magnitudes for E1 and E2. (You have placed the vectors in a rather unusual position relative to point P.)

What did you get for the magnitudes of E1 and E2 ?
 
  • #5
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Hello josh12399 . Welcome to PF .

View attachment 103390

The resultant you have for E1 + E2 looks to be correct providing that you used correct magnitudes for E1 and E2. (You have placed the vectors in a rather unusual position relative to point P.)

What did you get for the magnitudes of E1 and E2 ?
To be honest I have no idea what to use for the magnitude. I tried a bunch of different things and got totally different answers.

I thought of splitting them up into EX1, EY1, EX2 and EY2, but I don't know what the actual magnitude should be. Should it be (k*q*cosθ)/r2 for the x and (k*q*sinθ)/r2 for the y?
 
  • #6
SammyS
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To be honest I have no idea what to use for the magnitude. I tried a bunch of different things and got totally different answers.

I thought of splitting them up into EX1, EY1, EX2 and EY2, but I don't know what the actual magnitude should be. Should it be (k*q*cosθ)/r2 for the x and (k*q*sinθ)/r2 for the y?
Use the following:
E = Kq/r2
for the electric field (magnitude) due to each charge.
 
  • #7
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Use the following:

for the electric field (magnitude) due to each charge.
For each component (x and y)? Or should I just use the pythagorean theorem to find the diagonal distance from the charge to P?
 
  • #8
SammyS
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For each component (x and y)? Or should I just use the Pythagorean theorem to find the diagonal distance from the charge to P?
... just use the Pythagorean theorem to find the diagonal distance from the charge to P
 
  • #9
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... just use the Pythagorean theorem to find the diagonal distance from the charge to P
E1 = 1.730*105 N/C
E2 = -1.701*105 N/C

Now I take the X and Y components using sine and cosine?
 
  • #10
SammyS
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E1 = 1.730*105 N/C
E2 = -1.701*105 N/C

Now I take the X and Y components using sine and cosine?
Yes.
 

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