Vitamin B megadoses, smokers, and lung cancer rates

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In summary, megadoses of some micronutrients are prescribed for short periods of time. Then stopped. However, in general, micronutrient megadoses often have an antinutrient effect.
  • #1
jim mcnamara
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http://ascopubs.org/doi/abs/10.1200/JCO.2017.72.7735?journalCode=jco

For male aged 50-70 smokers taking vitamin B pills with megadose levels, rates of lung cancer increased by a factor of 30% - 40%. Females did not show the same response.

"Single" vitamin B pills: ex: Vitamin B12 only. These pills have large amounts of vitamin B relative to the daily requirement.

For me this is not a huge surprise. Megadoses of some micronutrients are prescribed for short periods of time. Then stopped. Example: Vitamin D at 3x daily value for one month may alter some EKG results positively. B vitamins are eliminated in urine, making urine a bright yellow. Excess vitamin D is not eliminated but stored.

But. In general, micronutrient megadoses often have an antinutrient effect. The most common example you will see in popular literature is vitamin C in large doses prevents absorption of copper, a required nutrient.

Megadoses of vitamins in some cases also have deleterious effects, example Vitamin D.
https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/VitaminD-HealthProfessional/

If you want more scientifically oriented information on specific micronutrient supplements this gives the whole large list:
https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/list-all
 
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  • #3
Livestrong is a commercial site, and not necessarily reliable scientifically. I am after nothing, no specific goal. Just want to direct people to actual accepted medical/scientific data meant for non-scientists. NIH is the best source for this stuff. Livestrong may be fun, but it is like talking to your lovable Aunt Gertie who says 'I read somewhere that magnets cause cancer'.

PS: your link cites no scientific paper, nothing. We do not want that at PF, except in General Discussion. Please don't do that.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3737019 -why megadoses are bad.
 
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  • #4
jim mcnamara said:
Livestrong is a commercial site, and not necessarily reliable scientifically. I am after nothing, no specific goal. Just want to direct people to actual accepted medical/scientific data meant for non-scientists. NIH is the best source for this stuff. Livestrong may be fun, but it is like talking to your lovable Aunt Gertie who says 'I read somewhere that magnets cause cancer'.

PS: your link cites no scientific paper, nothing. We do not want that at PF, except in General Discussion. Please don't do that.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3737019 -why megadoses are bad.
From the abstract in the above link "There are six categories that require vitamin supplements and, in some cases, megadoses... Finally, a brief review of the potential risks and benefits of megadoses in normal, healthy adults will be given." (bolding by me).

So your own link is saying that it can be bad or good as I said above. I agree that megadoses of vitamins are a treatment just as drugs are, and can be dangerous. My link was just an example that such things exist - it was not intended as proof of anything. There are sites that show references, but I did not want to spend the time to find one.

By the way, I was only able to read the abstract from your link, making it quite useless. What does it take to be able to read the whole article?
 
  • #5
My bad.
This is all the PUBMED site has, presumably because the article comes from the late 1980's. I chose this one because it had been cited a lot in some other papers.
PMID- 3737019
OWN - NLM
STAT- MEDLINE
DA - 19860917
DCOM- 19860917
LR - 20131121
IS - 0361-1817 (Print)
IS - 0361-1817 (Linking)
VI - 11
IP - 7
DP - 1986 Jul
TI - Vitamin supplementation and megadoses.
PG - 19-26, 31-6
AB - Almost one-third of American adults regularly take vitamins and supplements. If
taken incorrectly or in excess, these vitamins may be a potential health hazard.
Vitamins are essential nutrients which, in combination with other nutrients
(e.g., fats, carbohydrates and proteins), foster normal metabolism. Vitamins also
interact with each other. For example, vitamin C participates in the metabolism
of folic acid, and vitamin E facilitates the absorption and storage of vitamin A.
Because the biological functions of vitamins are interrelated, a diet poor in
vitamins, carbohydrates, fats and proteins is not necessarily enhanced by vitamin
supplementation. When vitamins are taken in excess of the Recommended Dietary
Allowances or the individual's needs, the vitamins no longer function as vitamins
but instead act as drugs, with such pharmacological effects as clinical
toxicities and the abnormal utilization of vitamins. There are six categories
that require vitamin supplements and, in some cases, megadoses. These will be
discussed in detail. In addition, a brief table showing the Recommended Dietary
Allowances will be given which the nurse practitioner can use in assessing
nutritional needs of the client so that necessary adjustments can be made.
Finally, a brief review of the potential risks and benefits of megadoses in
normal, healthy adults will be given.
FAU - Blair, K A
AU - Blair KA
LA - eng
PT - Journal Article
PL - United States
TA - Nurse Pract
JT - The Nurse practitioner
JID - 7603663
RN - 0 (Dietary Proteins)
RN - 0 (Vitamins)
RN - PQ6CK8PD0R (Ascorbic Acid)
SB - IM
SB - N
MH - Ascorbic Acid/adverse effects
MH - Body Weight
MH - Diet
MH - Dietary Proteins/administration & dosage
MH - Energy Intake
MH - Energy Metabolism
MH - Health Status
MH - Humans
MH - Nurse Practitioners
MH - Nutritional Requirements
MH - *Orthomolecular Therapy/adverse effects
MH - Risk
MH - Vitamins/adverse effects/metabolism/*therapeutic use
EDAT- 1986/07/01
MHDA- 1986/07/01 00:01
CRDT- 1986/07/01 00:00
PST - ppublish
SO - Nurse Pract. 1986 Jul;11(7):19-26, 31-6.

I'll get a better link...
 
  • #6
When you go to pubmed, one of the features is the search language used, you can see and edit it, then rerun the search.
It is on the right side of the screen and has a text frame with a button labelled 'Search'

I do not know what you can and cannot read because medical terminology is sometimes impenetrable -- I've been working with it for years and still have to look up lots of things. Especially clinical, I'm not a physician.

Try playing with a detail search and see what looks accessible to you.
Query:
Code:
megadose[All Fields] AND ("vitamins"[Pharmacological Action] OR "vitamins"[MeSH Terms] OR "vitamins"[All Fields] OR "vitamin"[All Fields]) AND ("pathology"[Subheading] OR "pathology"[All Fields] OR "pathology"[MeSH Terms])
MeSH is a kind metadata, somewhat like the tags we have on PF.
 

Related to Vitamin B megadoses, smokers, and lung cancer rates

1. What are vitamin B megadoses and how do they relate to lung cancer rates in smokers?

Vitamin B megadoses refer to extremely high doses of vitamin B supplements that exceed the recommended daily intake. Studies have shown that these megadoses can increase the risk of lung cancer in smokers due to the production of free radicals and oxidative stress in the body.

2. Can vitamin B megadoses prevent lung cancer in smokers?

No, there is no evidence to support that vitamin B megadoses can prevent lung cancer in smokers. In fact, it may increase the risk due to the production of free radicals. A balanced diet and avoiding smoking are the most effective ways to prevent lung cancer.

3. Are there any benefits of taking vitamin B megadoses for smokers?

No, there are no known benefits of taking vitamin B megadoses for smokers. In fact, it may have harmful effects on the body and increase the risk of lung cancer. It is important to stick to the recommended daily intake of vitamin B.

4. Are there any other factors that contribute to lung cancer rates in smokers?

Yes, smoking is the primary cause of lung cancer, but other factors such as genetics, exposure to environmental toxins, and overall lifestyle habits can also play a role in increasing the risk of lung cancer in smokers.

5. Is there a safe level of vitamin B supplementation for smokers?

Yes, the recommended daily intake of vitamin B for adults is 2.4 mcg, and it is generally safe to take up to 100 times this amount. However, it is important to consult with a healthcare professional before taking any supplements, especially if you are a smoker.

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