What are the expectations of our children?

  • Thread starter WhoWee
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  • #1
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Main Question or Discussion Point

President Obama recently made a speech in Tuscon, AZ - after a brutal attack that resulted in the shooting of 19 people including a popular Congresswoman, and the killing of 5 others including a Federal Judge and an innocent 9 year old girl. In the speech, the President suggested that we should live up to the expectations of the murdered child.

http://www.comcast.net/video/obama-live-up-to-our-childrens-expectations/1740386853/fanNews/newest/

Accordingly I ask, what are the expectations of our children? What do children expect from parents, siblings, relatives, friends, educators, schools, public servants, crime prevention and safety issues, the economy, long term career prospects, retirement, national defense, and of course - Government in gereral? How do our children in 2011 view the world?
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
PhilKravitz
My 27 year old son has a B.A. from Marlboro College. He is unable to find work in the U.S. beyond chopping firewood and yard work. Has worked a year in China teaching English at Southwest University. When asked, "how will you pay for the medical insurance that the federal government requires you to get?" answered he plans to be out of the country. He is leaving in February to teach English at a university in Russia.
 
  • #3
PhilKravitz
My 26 year son makes a $1 above minimum wage working part time (no benefits) at a store in the mall. We paid for the dental work he recently needed. He sometimes borrows a friends car to go places around town.
 
  • #4
PhilKravitz
My 15 year old son is taking a "College and Careers" class in public high school they have told the class to be careful what they post on the internet as it could stop them from getting a job in the future.
 
  • #5
149
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My 27 year old son has a B.A. from Marlboro College. He is unable to find work in the U.S. beyond chopping firewood and yard work. Has worked a year in China teaching English at Southwest University. When asked, "how will you pay for the medical insurance that the federal government requires you to get?" answered he plans to be out of the country. He is leaving in February to teach English at a university in Russia.
I know a young man that is teaching English in Russia. He too had difficulty finding work after graduation and has been there about 4 years. As a young man, he wanted to become a chemist, but found when he entered the university that he was too far behind in his studies - had too much fun in high school. He calls his father every Sunday afternoon and seems content - does a good bit of traveling.
 
  • #6
149
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My 15 year old son is taking a "College and Careers" class in public high school they have told the class to be careful what they post on the internet as it could stop them from getting a job in the future.
That sounds like good advice. I've advised by kids to think before they post stupid photos and comments on the sites they visit. Given the experiences of your older children, has your 15 year old been influenced?
 
  • #7
anuse10
It is not realistic to warrant a bright future or career to your kids. As the world is ever changing, no one can predict the needs of the job market.

As a guy of 26 years old, I would say I am working very hard to polish my skills and resume - writing, language, quantitative, social skills and so on, and when the opportunity comes, I will have a higher chance to seize it.
 
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  • #8
149
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It is not realistic to warrant a bright future or career to your kids. As the world is ever changing, no one can predict the needs of the job market.

As a guy of 26 years old, I would say I am working very hard to polish my skills and resume - writing, language, quantitative, social skills and so on, and when the opportunity comes, I will having a higher chance to seize it.
Your advice is to prepare well and look for the best opportunity?
 
  • #9
anuse10
Exactly what I am saying :)
 
  • #10
149
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Exactly what I am saying :)
Have you always had the same expectations of your future?
 
  • #11
I think our kids expect to have bright futures full of prospective opportunities. As a mother I try to impress upon my children the importance of pursuing their own goals in an entrepreneurial way.

My ten year old says:"I will be a police officer. It will be hard to become. I will have to take a test."

My five year old says: "I will be obewankenobe. It will be hard to become a jedi knight. I will have to take a test."
 
  • #12
anuse10
Have you always had the same expectations of your future?
Nay, there are always economic upturns and downturns. All one can do is to sharpen his skills to get prepared for the future, or at least for the time being.

For school kids I would recommend work hard for school work and be involved in social activities. For working guys I would recommend work hard to get credit from your supervisors.

WhoWee please feel free to spit out your views :)

tamaraboyyd, I admire your way to inspire your kids. How do you do so in an entrepreneurial way?
 
  • #13
149
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WhoWee please feel free to spit out your views :)
I've always tried to be balanced when talking about the future. I've been heard saying things that indicate there is opportunity and tempered with a dose of reality. A solid education is important and you need to find something you enjoy doing. The sky is the limit, but you get there in small steps. Put thought into your decisions and planning, then stay the course.
 
  • #14
149
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My kids understand I'll help them as much as possible (and there are limits) - but it's up to them to live their own lives and make their own choices. When called upon for help - I prioritize (aside from an emergency) based on the level of effort they are putting into helping themselves. I don't do their homework while they sleep and not having it done is absolutely not a reason to take a day off.
 
  • #15
Pengwuino
Gold Member
4,989
15
I think our kids expect to have bright futures full of prospective opportunities. As a mother I try to impress upon my children the importance of pursuing their own goals in an entrepreneurial way.

My ten year old says:"I will be a police officer. It will be hard to become. I will have to take a test."

My five year old says: "I will be obewankenobe. It will be hard to become a jedi knight. I will have to take a test."
continues...

My 28 year old says: "I will be a phd physicist. It will be hard to become a phd physicist. I will have to take a test" :biggrin:
 
  • #16
149
0
continues...

My 28 year old says: "I will be a phd physicist. It will be hard to become a phd physicist. I will have to take a test" :biggrin:

Oh yes, the "test" - it's the great equalizer. My oldest kids are twins. She is quite serious - studies and works very hard to achieve excellent grades. He works hard on sports and girls and cars - and still gets good grades. They sat together for the ACT. She prepared for about a month - he stayed up late playing video games the night before.

They scored the same overall on the ACT. He tests very well and she chokes - nearly every time. If they both ask for help - I typically help her first.
 
  • #17
309
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Children come into this world small, fragile, helpless and totally dependent on their caretakers who introduce them to a world they have never before encountered. Within each child is an unstated acknowledgment of its own vulnerability and dependance.

What do they expect from the perplexing adult world?

They expect compassionate, loving, wise guidance and protection from parents and other adults until they can reach adulthood themselves and wing it on their own. Anything to the contrary, such as the infliction of physical or mental cruelty are perceived as traitorous and the perpetrators as unworthy of love or respect.
 
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  • #18
149
0
Children come into this world small, fragile, helpless and totally dependent on their caretakers who introduce them to a world they have never before encountered. Within each child is an unstated acknowledgment of its own vulnerability and dependance.

What do they expect from the perplexing adult world?

They expect compassionate, loving, wise guidance and protection from parents and other adults until they can reach adulthood themselves and wing it on their own. Anything to the contrary, such as the infliction of physical or mental cruelty are perceived as traitorous and the perpetrators as unworthy of love or respect.
Agreed. Any thoughts on what children expect once they reach the point where they can "wing it"? Do they see accept any responsibility for their own preparation and training (for instance)?
 

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