What are the fundamental forces involved in the chemical reaction?

In summary: MD is a type of simulation that uses molecules as the basic unit. It's used to study the behavior of complex molecules and systems.
  • #1

Pythagorean

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I'm assuming the standard reductionist viewpoint: that chemistry is simplified quantum physics.

Of the four fundamental forces in modern physics, what forces play a role in chemical reactions? Is it safe to assume it's solely electromagnetics?
 
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  • #2
Yes, from what I understand all chemical reactions involve transfer or sharing of electrons, and thus are electrical in nature.
But wiser people here can correct and/or punish me if I am wrong.
 
  • #3
That's my understanding- purely electro-magnetic. The distance between atoms is too great for nuclear forces (strong and weak) to play a roll and the masses are too small for gravity to be significant.
 
  • #4
HallsofIvy said:
That's my understanding- purely electro-magnetic. The distance between atoms is too great for nuclear forces (strong and weak) to play a roll and the masses are too small for gravity to be significant.

As for gravity, what about in the case of turbulence (in fluid chemical reactions) and precipitation reactions?

I suppose there's somewhat of a conceptual divide here. Gravity would have no effect on the stochiometry, for instance, because stochiometry equations assume perfect contact between reagents, but gravity may have an effect on a chemical experiment's end results if the question was a physical one.

I'm asking this question from the perspective of neurology, as to whether the reductionist view of brain science to electromagnetic forces is valid. My opinion so far is that it is.
 
  • #5
Electromagnetism and the Pauli principle, whether you want to consider the latter a force or not was just debated in another thread. But in any case, exchange contributions are necessary for chemistry.

The functions of the brain are probably reducible to chemistry but there's probably no reason to go for a full chemical description. The behavior and dynamics of biochemical systems is routinely studied with quasiclassical MD simulations.
 
  • #6
alxm said:
Electromagnetism and the Pauli principle, whether you want to consider the latter a force or not was just debated in another thread. But in any case, exchange contributions are necessary for chemistry.

The functions of the brain are probably reducible to chemistry but there's probably no reason to go for a full chemical description. The behavior and dynamics of biochemical systems is routinely studied with quasiclassical MD simulations.

What is MD?

I've been studying the molecular neuroscience summary from the science education forums here on PF (Thanks PF). I suppose it would be considered quasiclassical because of the chemistry backbround?

http://www.cord.edu/faculty/ulnessd/neuroscience/neuronotes.pdf [Broken]
 
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  • #7
MD=molecular dynamics
 

1. What are the fundamental forces involved in a chemical reaction?

The fundamental forces involved in a chemical reaction are electromagnetic force, gravitational force, strong nuclear force, and weak nuclear force. These forces determine how atoms interact with each other and the energy involved in a chemical reaction.

2. How does the electromagnetic force play a role in a chemical reaction?

The electromagnetic force is responsible for the attraction and repulsion of charged particles, such as electrons and protons. In a chemical reaction, this force is involved in the formation and breaking of chemical bonds between atoms.

3. What is the role of gravitational force in a chemical reaction?

Gravitational force is the weakest of the fundamental forces and is not typically a major factor in chemical reactions. However, it can play a role in the movement of molecules and the overall energy of a reaction.

4. How does the strong nuclear force contribute to a chemical reaction?

The strong nuclear force is responsible for holding the nucleus of an atom together. In a chemical reaction, this force is involved in the breaking and formation of bonds between atoms, which determines the stability of the resulting molecules.

5. What is the significance of the weak nuclear force in a chemical reaction?

The weak nuclear force is responsible for certain types of nuclear decay, such as beta decay. In a chemical reaction, this force is not usually a major factor, but it can play a role in the stability of certain atoms and their ability to participate in reactions.

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