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Medical What are your views on learning disabilities

  1. Mar 18, 2009 #1
    Do you think learning disabilities exist and they should be addressed or do you think the term learning disability is a euphemism for "stupid"? I think learning disabilities exist , but I don't think the schools do a good jobs of addressing the needs of students with learning disabilities. The educators of public schools and even college really don't do a great job of accomodating the needs of the students other than just giving them extended time on the test. That is why I am a strong advocating of homeschooling and making no further investments in our public schools, since homeschooling will do a much better job of addressing and pinpointing the students weaknesses of a student particular approach to a student's problem. Even if the teacher cares about developing learning methods that would better fit the needs of a student with a "learning disability" , it would be impossible for them because since a typical classroom is reaches about 30 people and you cannot possibly apply each individual learning method that best suited for each individual student. 9 times out of 10 , when you are home-schooled , it is usually a one-to-one interaction between the student and the parent, therefore the needs of the students are addressed more efficiently . That way students are less likely to be labeled "stupid" by home-school educators vs. the teachers in public schools , since public schools teachers don't truly have time to understand why a certain student has a hard time learning the material in the class and therefore they placed the student in a lower level class.
     
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  3. Mar 18, 2009 #2

    mgb_phys

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    It is interesting that 'learning difficulties' along with dyslexia rises exponentially when countries introduce SAT/testing/league tables.
    If the aim of school is to maximise test scores and the teachers, parents, heads/principles out their heads together - they can get very creative.
     
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2009
  4. Mar 18, 2009 #3

    brewnog

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    What a ridiculous proposal. What about all those kids with learning disabilities who will never learn to interact with other kids because they're tied to the apron strings? How are they going to get on in the real world, having had no experience of playing/fighting with other children at lunchtime, participating in debate with a wide variety of other people, or being exposed to a broad spectrum of teaching styles?
     
  5. Mar 18, 2009 #4
    They can still interact with other people around them. I hear this argument all the time. Can you please show me data or some sort of study that says homeschool children have a hard time interacting with people? You don't have to physically be in contact with people to interact with people ; They can go on forums and messageboards like these and talk to people; The internet has brought us closer to each other rather than separate us.
     
  6. Mar 18, 2009 #5
    Correlation =/= Causation
     
  7. Mar 18, 2009 #6

    mgb_phys

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    correlation.png
     
  8. Mar 18, 2009 #7
    to get the best results from the OP's proposal, you would need all children to be in 2-parent homes where one parent doesn't work, preferably the more intelligent parent, which might lead to a reduction in family income. gifted children born to average parents would also be disadvantaged.
     
  9. Mar 19, 2009 #8

    brewnog

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    I have no evidence. You're right, I'm wrong.
     
  10. Mar 19, 2009 #9

    alxm

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    Obviously, in the best of worlds, every student, whether they had a learning disability or not, would have at least one teacher dedicated to them full-time, so that their pedagogy could be tailored to their particular needs, interests and ways.

    That doesn't necessarily mean home-schooling is better, though.
     
  11. Mar 19, 2009 #10

    Evo

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    What country do you live in?

    Here in the US there are special education and special needs classes developed especially for kids with learning disabilities. The teachers have special training.

    The average parent does not have the proper education to teach special ed kids, that's even if they had the time, patience, or desire to do it.
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2009
  12. Mar 19, 2009 #11

    mgb_phys

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    That's true for those kids who actually do have physiological learning difficulties = some level of mental handicap.
    But learning difficulties or dyslexia also seems to have been adopted as a way of explaining every kid below class mean. Either for a good reason - to be non-judgemental and not damage their self esteem, or cynically so as to manipulate average test scores.

    If the school has decided to basically ignore the lower half of the class because they wreck the curve then home schooling might not be such a dumb idea.
     
  13. Mar 19, 2009 #12

    Evo

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    Who is going to teach the kid? Many parents are single, many wouldn't be able to teach even if they didn't work.
     
  14. Mar 19, 2009 #13
    I live in the US and no the teachers, at least at my school, did a terrible job of teaching me. I learned third grade math when I should have been learning math at a fifth grade level. The special ed teachers thought it was best for me to continue on the special ed track and not take regular classes. My parents disagree. I disagree about teachers having the proper education to teach special kids . Parents can assess there kids needs more effectively, since they know who their kids are. I suspect most public schools are equipped with quality special ed teachers.

    I disagree about parents not having the proper education to teach there children. Home-school students are generally more knowleagble in general school-taught subject areas than most kids who attend public schools. I would go further by saying if you just leave a kid alone and guide them to the subjects of interests, they could teach themselves. Many geniuses and great thinkers taught themselves , Like Lebniz , Issac Newton, Ben Franklin , Nietschtze and a lot of other great minds I don't feel like listing.
     
  15. Mar 21, 2009 #14

    brewnog

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    And I'm sure most average children will be able to train themselves to the level of Newton and Nietzsche.
     
  16. Mar 23, 2009 #15
    Learning disabilities are very real, I should know because I suffer from them. One thing needs to be made clear above all else though, and that is that learning disabilities have nothing to do with having low intelligence. My IQ when tested in high school was 120. Even though I struggled in elementary school with dyslexia and dyscalcula, by the time I reached 7th grade I was put in normal classes because I had improved so much thanks to my parents getting me so much help, and when I got to high school I became an A, B student. I also went to summer ventures in science and math. I would have gone on to a university after high school if it had not been for the fact that I started having major mental problems. I did manage to get a two year degree from a community college though. And I was very harassed there because the staff knew that I had learning and mental problems. It might take me longer to learn something sometimes compared to someone else without learning problems, but I still have the ability to learn anything that anyone else can. Having a learning disability doesn't mean that somebody can't learn, it just means its going to be harder for them.
     
    Last edited: Mar 23, 2009
  17. Mar 24, 2009 #16
    Many UK schools have inclusion policies where students regardless of ability or disability are admitted.The same schools have special needs units with trained staff to help the kids,for example those who are visually impaired or hearing impaired.The special educational unit is usually the biggest and looks after kids with emotional and behavioural problems, Downs kids, autistic kids and kids with other special needs.In general these kids attend normal classes being accompanied by one or more of the special needs staff who help out.Very rarely these kids are withdrawn from lessons this usually being when they throw a fit and become disruptive.
     
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