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Medical What happens if you drink only coca cola or soft drinks?

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  1. Jul 1, 2016 #1
    I mean no water, assuming water just using drinks.
    Does this put you in danger or you can live a long life without having great problems?

    Do you risk 2 type diabete or only if you assume sugar also from other SOURCES?
    I mean is the sugar in soft drinks enough to put you in risk?

    talking about a "normal person" not someone that is overweight or has some particular medical issues
     
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  3. Jul 1, 2016 #2

    jim mcnamara

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    The short answer is yes. Drinking nothing but soft drinks is bad idea. If you define soft drinks as flavored sugar water possibly carbonated - then yeah, you have an increased risk for type II diabetes. (see link below)

    In 1982-84 I did the statistical analysis on an IHS (US Indian Health Service) project that attempted to project type II diabetes rates in the Navajo Reservation. The prediction was that 44% of adults would present with type II by the year 2000. Wrong - the reported rate was higher, slightly over 47% according to internal data.
    http://www.diabetes.org/diabetes-basics/type-2/

    The primary data set the medical staff at the IHS hospital were tracking was the consumption of coke, as it called there. People lived in remote hogans (houses) with no potable water supply. Every Saturday they drove into Gallup NM or Farmington NM and bought cases of Coca-cola. They drank the "cokes" instead of water. They hauled water for their sheep, but they were careful not to drink it unless it was boiled first. So they did drink some coffee and make soups and stews. And consumed water that way. But the sales data for the local Coca-cola distributors correlated well with diabetes rates tracked in the medical records. It also correlated with patient interviews.

    This is definitely not an absolute cause and effect. It is more of an anecdote, but is a possible answer to your question. And no, I do not have access to the data or to the documents.

    An older study from about the same period showed double the base US rate for diabetes in 1988-89:
    J Sugarman and C Percy. Prevalence of diabetes in a Navajo Indian community. American Journal of Public Health April 1989: Vol. 79, No. 4, pp. 511-513.
    doi: 10.2105/AJPH.79.4.511

    This paper from the period when type II rates were beginning to increase rapidly. They pointed the finger at obesity. The research I discussed was looking at what is now called glycemic load in a roundabout way. The real interest was getting funding for water systems.
    http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/mic/food-beverages/glycemic-index-glycemic-load
     
  4. Jul 1, 2016 #3

    Choppy

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    I suspect you know the general gist of this already.

    If your only source of hydration is from soft drinks, you're taking in about 140 calories directly from sugar every time you open a can.

    According to here, a typical male will take in about 3 litres of fluid per day. About 20% of that is from food. So if the rest comes from coke, you're looking at roughly 950 extra calories into your diet every day. According to here, a moderately active young male should be taking in roughly 2500 calories per day.

    If you are getting your hydration exclusively from soft drinks, you're putting yourself in a situation where you are either increasing your healthy calorie intake by about 38%, or you are getting 38% of your needed calories from an unhealthy source.

    Neither of these are good situations to be in. If you're currently someone who is not overweight and you're in the former category, guess what's going to happen over time. Those calories will accumulate. It takes an adult male about an hour and a half of hard running to burn off that many extra calories. Unless you're an athlete, you're probably not running that much every single day. If you're not obese now, this seems like a direct path to it.

    If you're in the latter category, you probably won't gain weight, but your body is going to have to work pretty hard to regulate all of that sugar. According to this meta-analysis, there is a link between consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages and type 2 diabetes independent of adiposity. I suspect that's not the only issue either if you're in this category, because there's all sorts of other stuff that your body needs that it isn't getting.

    EDIT: Jim posted while I was typing.
     
  5. Jul 1, 2016 #4

    TheBlackAdder

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    Awesome. Since I was young until puberty I was allowed to drink soda all day by my parents. No wonder I had caries each year. Then at some age I don't remember I suddenly stopped and only drank water. Since then I've never had any problems with my teeth.
     
  6. Jul 1, 2016 #5
    Jim and Choppy, what if he drank diet (or low cal) versions of the drinks?
     
  7. Jul 1, 2016 #6

    jim mcnamara

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    The caloric (and glycemic load) would go away. Obviously.

    I do not know of any studies showing benefits/detriments of getting all of your water from soda with artificial sweeteners.

    Please do NOT post stuff about aspartame:
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17828671
    This is a meta-analysis (there are others) that says bottom line: no cancer cause, no neurotoxicity, considered safe. Please read the abstract for more.
     
  8. Jul 1, 2016 #7

    rbelli1

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  9. Jul 1, 2016 #8

    Evo

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    I have to say that I doubt the validity of that study "diet soda", what is in the "diet soda" aspartame? saccharin? stevia? What about the other ingredients? No, I'm not expecting an answer, there is none.
     
  10. Jul 1, 2016 #9

    rbelli1

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    That study does state that it is a correlation and can't show causation.

    Here is another:
    http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1038/oby.2008.284/abstract

    I agree that these studies in no way definitively prove that the diet soda was the problem. However as more information comes to light I take that as more advice to drink water or any other unsweetened beverage instead of any kind of soda.

    BoB

    full disclosure: I do occasionally drink artificially sweetened beverages (average of about 1 per week) and even less occasionally sugar sweetened ones.
     
  11. Jul 1, 2016 #10

    Ygggdrasil

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    I haven't followed this field closely, so I'm not sure if these findings are widely accepted, but there is some evidence in animal studies that artificial sweeteners can cause type II diabetes by altering composition of the bacteria in our gut:
    http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v514/n7521/abs/nature13793.html

    Popular press summary: http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt...ter-our-gut-microbes-and-the-risk-of-diabetes
     
  12. Jul 1, 2016 #11

    Evo

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    All artificial sweeteners? All? What about diet tea, why do they single out diet soda? I find it hard to believe without anything specific. The artificial sweeteners are very different. I could believe that certain ones have certain effects but not that all have identical effects. I find it odd that they do not state which one(s) were used in the study.
     
  13. Jul 1, 2016 #12

    Ygggdrasil

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    In the article I cited, they tested saccharin, sucralose and aspartame and saw similar effects with all three.
     
  14. Jul 1, 2016 #13

    Evo

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    Ok, thanks, I do not have access to the full article and it's not mentioned in the abstract. Did they mention what could be the common link between such different substances? If you don't know please don't bother digging through the paper to see if they even have any idea.
     
  15. Jul 1, 2016 #14

    Ygggdrasil

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    You would have had to read the full article to see that which, unfortunately, requires a subscription to Nature.

    As for why the NPR article focused on diet sodas, that's probably because diet sodas are the main source of artificial sweeteners for most people. The Nature paper tests the actual sweeteners themselves, not any soda or other type of drink.
     
  16. Jul 1, 2016 #15

    jim mcnamara

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  17. Jul 1, 2016 #16

    Ygggdrasil

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    I was curious about this as well but I didn't see the authors address this question after a quick skim through the paper. Given that the different sweeteners are quite different chemically, it's surprising that they would all produce similar effects. Hopefully someone is following up on this question.
     
  18. Jul 1, 2016 #17

    jim mcnamara

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    @Ygggdrasil that was my thought as well. Plus we all would hope to see followup studies.
     
  19. Jul 1, 2016 #18

    Evo

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    Thanks Jim! So it's saccharin. That would also coincide with a paper I found but couldn't read because it's behind a paywall and in German
    "Of mice and men--how saccharin induces glucose intolerance by altering the gut microbiota" http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25474285
     
  20. Jul 4, 2016 #19

    jim mcnamara

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    There do not seem to be direct followups published yet. The above study is cited here, for example.

    Here is another meta-analysis:
    Bottom line - NNS may not be a free ride to the goals to a subset of the population due to as yet unproven risks, so caution is advised.
     
  21. Jul 4, 2016 #20

    Evo

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    But, of the study you posted, although they tested several, only saccharin had negative effects on the gut, correct? Unfortunately the part about which ones where included in the test are being assumed to also be in the negative results, causing confusion.
     
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