What is a Bern model in planetary population synthesis?

In summary: The Bern model in atmospheric sciences is a model of the atmospheric dynamics of Earth-like planets.The Bern model in planetary system synthesis is a model of the formation and evolution of planets.
  • #1
Fabioonier
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TL;DR Summary
The planetary population synthesis are based on the Bern model and I want to know what it is.
Hello.
I'm writing my Master Thesis about planetary population synthesis and one of the chapters is about the different models.
I found that most of them are Bern models with some modifications.
What is a Bern model in planetary population synthesis and what references can I read about it?
Thanks for your cooperation.
 
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  • #2
Shouldn't finding this out be part of your thesis?
 
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  • #3
Fabioonier said:
Summary: The planetary population synthesis are based on the Bern model and I want to know what it is.

I found that most of them are Bern models with some modifications.
What is a Bern model in planetary population synthesis
How did you find the models for planetary system synthesis? What journals?

If you can post on PF, I suspect one might have access to Google, or other search engine.

Ditto to what V50 mentioned.
 
  • #4
Out of curiosity (not knowing what the 'Bern model' was) I spent a minute or two Googling and found a description including references to the original and ongoing papers. Come on now!
 
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  • #5
Astronuc said:
How did you find the models for planetary system synthesis? What journals?

If you can post on PF, I suspect one might have access to Google, or other search engine.

Ditto to what V50 mentioned.
Hi, Astronuc. Thanks for your answer.
That model was mentioned in
https://arxiv.org/abs/2007.05561
In this article the authors say "We base our study on the Bern model of planetary formation and evolution. This global model self- consistently computes the evolution of the gas and planetesimals discs, the accretion of gas and solids by the protoplanets, their internal and atmospheric structure, as well as interactions between the protoplanets and between the gas disc and the protoplanets."

But I want to know the origin of the name "Bern" because is not the last name of any author. When I googled about that model I found that there is a Bern Model in atmospheric sciences too. So, what means "Bern" model?
Thanks.
 
  • #6
Steve4Physics said:
Out of curiosity (not knowing what the 'Bern model' was) I spent a minute or two Googling and found a description including references to the original and ongoing papers. Come on now!
Thanks, Steve4Physics for your answer.
I also googled about the Bern Model and didn't found a kind of reference that you mentioned. Maybe I don't know strategies about what words to use for getting better results.
How did you google it and what specific reference you found with the original paper?
Thanks for your cooperation.
 
  • #7
Fabioonier said:
That model was mentioned in
https://arxiv.org/abs/2007.05561
In this article the authors say "We base our study on the Bern model of planetary formation and evolution. This global model self- consistently computes the evolution of the gas and planetesimals discs, the accretion of gas and solids by the protoplanets, their internal and atmospheric structure, as well as interactions between the protoplanets and between the gas disc and the protoplanets."
But I want to know the origin of the name "Bern" because is not the last name of any author.
On the other hand, in the arxiv paper one cited, note the author affiliations, especially the institution 2, Physikalisches Institut, Universität Bern, Gesellschaftsstrasse 6, 3012 Bern, Switzerland

The five of six authors: Alexandre Emsenhuber, Christoph Mordasini, Remo Burn, Yann Alibert, and Willy Benz have affiliation with Universität Bern. Isn't this obvious?!

Also, in the arxiv paper, Section 2, The Bern Model, 2.1 History - "The original model was introduced in Alibert et al. (2004,2005a) for individual planets, then used in Mordasini et al.(2009a,b) for entire planetary populations."!

Looking elsewhere from a Google search, I quickly found the following:
At the University of Bern, the "Bern Model of Planet Formation and Evolution" has been continuously developed since 2003. Christoph Mordasini says: "Insights into the manifold processes involved in the formation and evolution of planets are integrated into the model." Using this Bern model the researchers were able to calculate the composition of this rock-forming material of the cooled-down star. "We then compared that with the rocky planets," Christoph Mordasini says.

If one is doing a MS program, those of us, who have so far responded, are left wondering why one is having trouble finding articles on the Bern model, or its origin. In writing a MS thesis, one task should be a reasonably thorough literature review, which is a skill that researchers must develop. The point of an MS degree is to demonstrate one can do the research, which includes performing literature searches.

Couldn't one ask one's faculty advisor? Or perhaps another professor in one's department?
 
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Fabioonier said:
I also googled about the Bern Model and didn't found a kind of reference that you mentioned. Maybe I don't know strategies about what words to use for getting better results.
How did you google it and what specific reference you found with the original paper?
Thanks for your cooperation.
Hmm. OK. I can’t remember my exact actions but, from an initial search for ‘bern model’, I found out that there there are two ‘Bern models’. One is a carbon-cycle climate model and the other is about planetary formation. (I’d not heard of either model, but I’m quite ignorant.)

Since you posted in the Astronomy and Astrophysics section and mentioned planets I realized that you were referring to planetary formation.

So I did a more specific Google search for ‘bern model planetary formation’.

After exploring a few matches/links (can't remember exactly what links I clicked) I found this, for example:
https://export.arxiv.org/pdf/2007.05561
which even includes a history of the Bern model.

It’s not rocket science (haha).
 
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  • #9
Astronuc said:
On the the other hand, in the arxiv paper one cited, note the author affiliations, especially the institution 2, Physikalisches Institut, Universität Bern, Gesellschaftsstrasse 6, 3012 Bern, Switzerland

The five of six authors: Alexandre Emsenhuber, Christoph Mordasini, Remo Burn, Yann Alibert, and Willy Benz have affiliation with Universität Bern. Isn't this obvious?!

Also, in the arxiv paper, Section 2, The Bern Model, 2.1 History - "The original model was introduced in Alibert et al. (2004,2005a) for individual planets, then used in Mordasini et al.(2009a,b) for entire planetary populations."!

Looking elsewhere from a Google search, I quickly found the following:If one is doing a MS program, those of us, who have so far responded, are left wondering why one is having trouble finding articles on the Bern model, or its origin. In writing a MS thesis, one task should be a reasonably thorough literature review, which is a skill that researchers must develop. The point of an MS degree is to demonstrate one can do the research, which includes performing literature searches.

Couldn't one ask one's faculty advisor? Or perhaps another professor in one's department?
Thanks for your answer.
You are right about the skill for searching texts or references: I never thought about the university of the authors. Now, I'm thinking of the "Copenhague" interpretation of the Quantum Mechanics. Obviously, I have to improve that skill.

About this:
Also, in the arxiv paper, Section 2, The Bern Model, 2.1 History - "The original model was introduced in Alibert et al. (2004,2005a) for individual planets, then used in Mordasini et al.(2009a,b) for entire planetary populations."!

I have the articles: all of them and many others. A lot! The problem is that I was looking for an article in which that model was named "Bern Model" for the very first time. It's about skills and I have to develop them. I'm in the process.
Again, thanks for your answer.
This topic can be closed.
Have a nice day.
 
  • #10
Fabioonier said:
ut I want to know the origin of the name "Bern"
Look at where many of the authors of the paper you referenced are from, and look at where many of the authors of the Bern model in the references of that paper are from.
 

Related to What is a Bern model in planetary population synthesis?

1. What is a Bern model?

A Bern model is a type of planetary population synthesis model used in astrophysics and planetary science. It is a statistical model that predicts the distribution of planets in a planetary system based on various factors such as the mass and composition of the parent star, the formation and migration of planets, and the effects of planetary interactions.

2. How is the Bern model different from other population synthesis models?

The Bern model is unique in that it takes into account the effects of planetary migration, which is the movement of planets from their original orbits due to gravitational interactions with other planets or the parent star. This allows for a more accurate prediction of the final distribution of planets in a planetary system.

3. What are the key assumptions of the Bern model?

The Bern model assumes that planetary systems form from a disk of gas and dust around a young star, and that planets form through a process of accretion, where smaller objects collide and merge to form larger bodies. It also assumes that the orbits of planets can be altered by gravitational interactions with other planets or the parent star.

4. How is the Bern model validated?

The Bern model is validated by comparing its predictions to observations of known exoplanetary systems. If the predicted distribution of planets matches the observed distribution, it provides evidence that the model is accurate. Additionally, the Bern model can be tested by comparing its predictions to other population synthesis models and analyzing the differences.

5. What are the applications of the Bern model?

The Bern model is used to study the formation and evolution of planetary systems, as well as to predict the distribution of planets in a given system. It can also be used to inform future observations and missions, as well as to understand the potential habitability of exoplanets. Additionally, the Bern model can help scientists better understand the processes that shape our own solar system.

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