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What is a phasor

  1. Jan 29, 2013 #1
    Could someone please give me an explanation of what we mean we say phasor please. We went over phasors in class today and I understood all the manipulations we were doing for superposition but my professor mentioned phasors and never said what they were. I have looked up several definitions but it isn't gelling for me. Thanks in advance!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 29, 2013 #2

    Andrew Mason

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    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    Was he talking about Star Trek or electricity?

    Phasors are vectors drawn in a circle to represent the phase differences of alternating current or voltages so that values can be calculated.

    AM
     
  4. Jan 30, 2013 #3

    NascentOxygen

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    Staff: Mentor

    A phasor is a rotating vector. In 99.9% of your course of study you can neglect the fact that they rotate; just manipulate them like ordinary vectors. They rotate because a sinewave can be represented by the projection of a rotating vector onto a chosen axis.
     
  5. Jan 30, 2013 #4
    Thanks so much! Much clearer now.
     
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