What is the difference between Cytotoxic and Cytogenotoxic?

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In summary, cytotoxic substances are those that can kill cells, including cancer cells. Cytogenotoxic substances, on the other hand, can cause mutations in a cell's DNA, which can potentially lead to cancer. Other terms used for mutation and cancer-causing substances include mutogenic and carcinogenic. It is important to note that not all mutations are harmful. Additionally, cytotoxic substances are poisonous to cells. Genotoxicity, as found through research, can affect DNA and other processes within a cell, but it may not necessarily result in mutation. A cancer researcher may have a better understanding of these concepts.
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TytoAlba95
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I did a little research, but I'm not fully confident if what I found is correct.

Cytotoxic: Anything that kills cells (including cancer cells).
Cytogenotoxic: Anything that mutates the DNA of a cell (can lead to cancer).
 
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  • #2
SanjuktaGhosh said:
I did a little research, but I'm not fully confident if what I found is correct.

Cytotoxic: Anything that kills cells (including cancer cells).
Cytogenotoxic: Anything that mutates the DNA of a cell (can lead to cancer).
Mutogenic and carcinogenic are terms we use for causing mutation and cancer causing.
Remember most mutations are neutral.
Cytotoxic is poisonous to the cell.
 
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  • #3
pinball1970 said:
Mutogenic and carcinogenic are terms we use for causing mutation and cancer causing.
Remember most mutations are neutral.
Cytotoxic is poisonous to the cell.
Genotoxicity from a search relates to an affect on the DNA but not necessarily a mutation. So it may affect protein synthesis, gene regulation etc.
@yddd is a cancer researcher, he will have a better handle.
 
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Related to What is the difference between Cytotoxic and Cytogenotoxic?

1. What is the definition of cytotoxic and cytogenotoxic?

Cytotoxic and cytogenotoxic are terms used to describe substances or agents that can cause damage to cells in the body. Cytotoxicity refers to the ability of a substance to kill cells, while cytogenotoxicity refers to the ability of a substance to cause damage to the genetic material of cells.

2. What are some examples of cytotoxic and cytogenotoxic substances?

Examples of cytotoxic substances include chemotherapy drugs, certain pesticides, and environmental toxins. Cytogenotoxic substances can include radiation, certain chemicals found in food or water, and some medications.

3. How do cytotoxic and cytogenotoxic substances differ in their effects on cells?

Cytotoxic substances primarily target and kill cells, while cytogenotoxic substances can cause damage to the DNA of cells, potentially leading to mutations and other genetic abnormalities.

4. Can cytotoxic and cytogenotoxic substances have overlapping effects?

Yes, some substances can have both cytotoxic and cytogenotoxic effects. For example, certain chemotherapy drugs can both kill cells and cause damage to their DNA.

5. How can the effects of cytotoxic and cytogenotoxic substances be measured?

The effects of cytotoxic and cytogenotoxic substances can be measured through various laboratory tests, such as cell viability assays and genetic tests. These tests can help determine the extent of damage to cells and their genetic material caused by these substances.

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