What Is the Role of J x B in Rotating Magnetic Field Current Drives?

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In summary, the paper discusses the use of a rotating magnetic field to drive current in a high-temperature plasma, with the goal of sustaining the magnetic flux and extending the lifetime of the plasma. The J x B equations are used to describe this process and can only be applied to plasmas, not regular wires.
  • #1
Jdo300
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Hello All,

I have had some interest in the effects of rotating magnetic fields and was doing some research on the subject when I came across the following paper published from the University of Washington:;

http://wsx.lanl.gov/Publications/RSI-RMF-Tobin-paper.pdf

The paper discusses some experiments involving a high power, high speed rotating magnetic field. I didn't read through the entire paper but there was one spot on the first page that really caught my attention:

"The Translation, Confinement and Sustainment (TCS) Experiment located at the Redmond Plasma
Physic Laboratory (RPPL) of the University of Washington was designed to apply, for the first time, a
rotating magnetic field (RMF) to a high-temperature field reversed configuration (FRC) plasma (Te ~ 100
eV and Ti ~ 300 eV) [1]. The RMF current drive technique is a special case of the more general j x B
current drive scheme, by which electrons are “pulled” along with the rotating magnetic field [2].
Unlike
inductive current drive systems, RMF current drive is steady state. The RMF is used for the purpose of
building up and sustaining the magnetic flux of the FRC. The exp erimental goal is to benchmark this
current drive technique against theoretical predictions, and to determine the robustness of the FRC plasma
to this external perturbation. An initial goal for the RMF system was to extend the lifetime of the FRC by a
factor of ~3; this goal has already been achieved with pulses lasting 1 ms. It was anticipated that a 1 ms
pulse would become limited by particle inventory rather than resistive flux losses. At present particle
inventory is not limiting lifetime, exactly why is not yet understood."


I am particularly interested in the part that I highlighted in boldface. I was wondering if anyone here may know anything about "rotating magnetic field current drive" systems, and how the J x B equations fits into this? I am very interested in learning more about this. Does it only apply to plasmas or could the effect take place in regular wires too?

Thank you,
Jason O
 
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  • #2
Hi Jason,

I'm not an expert on rotating magnetic fields, but I do know a bit about the J x B equations. The J x B equations are used to describe a current that is driven in a conductor by a changing magnetic field, which results in a force that is perpendicular to both the current and the magnetic field. This type of force can be used to drive the plasma contained in your experiment, which describes the rotation of the magnetic field. I'm not sure if this effect can be applied to regular wires, but it definitely applies to plasma.
 
  • #3
.

Dear Jason O.,

Thank you for sharing your interest in rotating magnetic fields and the paper from the University of Washington. The special case of J x B mentioned in the paper refers to the use of a rotating magnetic field (RMF) for current drive in plasmas. In this technique, the rotating magnetic field induces a current in the plasma, which in turn generates magnetic fields that can confine and sustain the plasma.

The J x B term refers to the force experienced by a charged particle in a magnetic field. In this case, the RMF causes the electrons in the plasma to move along with the rotating magnetic field, resulting in a net current. This is different from inductive current drive systems, where the current is induced by changing the magnetic field.

The use of rotating magnetic fields for current drive has been studied in various plasma experiments, including fusion research. It is not limited to plasmas, as it can also be used to induce currents in regular wires. However, the specific effects and applications may differ depending on the system.

I hope this helps to answer your questions and provides some insight into the special case of J x B in the context of rotating magnetic fields. It is a fascinating area of research, and I encourage you to continue exploring and learning more about it.


 

Related to What Is the Role of J x B in Rotating Magnetic Field Current Drives?

1. What is the "Special case of J x B" in science?

The "Special case of J x B" refers to a specific situation in which a magnetic field (B) and an electric current (J) are both present and perpendicular to each other. This creates a force known as the Lorentz force, which is given by the cross product J x B. It is a fundamental concept in electromagnetism and has many important applications in physics and engineering.

2. How is the Lorentz force calculated in the "Special case of J x B"?

The Lorentz force in the "Special case of J x B" is calculated by taking the cross product of the electric current (J) and the magnetic field (B). This means multiplying the magnitude of J, the magnitude of B, and the sine of the angle between them. The resulting force is perpendicular to both J and B, and its direction is given by the right-hand rule.

3. What is the significance of the "Special case of J x B" in plasma physics?

The "Special case of J x B" is of great importance in plasma physics because it is the dominant force that governs the motion of charged particles in a plasma. This force is responsible for confining the plasma and shaping its structure, making it a crucial concept in fusion research and other plasma-related studies.

4. Can the Lorentz force in the "Special case of J x B" be used to create a magnetic field?

Yes, the Lorentz force in the "Special case of J x B" can be used to create a magnetic field. When an electric current (J) flows through a wire, it generates a magnetic field (B) around it. By controlling the direction and magnitude of the current, a desired magnetic field can be produced, which has various practical applications such as in electromagnets and electric motors.

5. What are some real-life examples of the "Special case of J x B" in action?

The "Special case of J x B" can be observed in many everyday situations, such as in the operation of electric motors, generators, and transformers. It is also responsible for the formation of auroras in the Earth's atmosphere, as charged particles from the Sun interact with the planet's magnetic field. In addition, the Lorentz force in the "Special case of J x B" is used in medical imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

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