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What is this equipment I just found?

  1. May 21, 2015 #1
    Found this in a back cabinet. It's old. I think the case was taken off. Anyone have an idea of what it is.

    b4GR9XK.jpg
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 21, 2015 #2

    berkeman

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    Staff: Mentor

    Can you post pictures from different angles? And maybe put some common item or a ruler next to it to show its scale... :smile:
     
  4. May 21, 2015 #3
    What does the label say? Are there any other labels? Any other markings at all? My first guess is that it's the heart of a TARDIS.
     
  5. May 21, 2015 #4
    Here are some new pictures of it.
    HslDr34.jpg
    7zSCmDz.jpg
    LMJDOwD.jpg
    iqm6GHL.jpg
     
  6. May 21, 2015 #5

    berkeman

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    It looks like the center part is free to rotate some in the outer frame? If so, by how much?
     
  7. May 21, 2015 #6

    berkeman

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    And in that last picture, can you zoom in on the white label near the base? Is it a calibration sticker?
     
  8. May 21, 2015 #7
    It has the ability to rotate 360 from 3 different sections, so in all directions.

    KNBvPMh.jpg

    ciQETWD.jpg
    DanZkyQ.jpg
     
  9. May 21, 2015 #8

    berkeman

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    Like a 3-axis gyroscope?
     
  10. May 21, 2015 #9
    Yes, I believe so
     
  11. May 21, 2015 #10

    Baluncore

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    It looks like a gyroscope used for aircraft attitude control, such as an artificial horizon. It could also be from a tank or mobile gun. The gyroscope is mounted in servo driven gimbals that maintains the initial orientation of the gyroscope. A synchro transmitter on each axis sends a multi-phase signal that reports the angular position of the gyroscope module within the gimbals for each axis. It therefore gives the orientation of the vehicle / aircraft.

    Power and signals are routed through slip-rings through each gimbal rotational axis. It has servo-motor driven gimbals, to overcome the friction of those connections across the gimbal bearings. Any slight error in the position of the gyroscope within the central module is detected and fed to a servo motor that will cancel that error and so maintain orientation of the gyroscope.
     
  12. May 21, 2015 #11

    Baluncore

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    The synchro transmitters were made by Clifton Precision, a division of Litton Industries Inc. They were not necessarily the manufacturer of the complete unit.
    The code number we need for a positive identification is probably written on the cover that is face down on the bench top. We don't need a photo, just the text.
    I am sure it must be a directional gyro.
     
    Last edited: May 23, 2015
  13. May 23, 2015 #12

    Baluncore

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    Manufacturer 06481. Part 657650.

    06481 was the manufacturer cage code for "Litton Systems Inc, Guidance And Control Systems Div".
    Now merged to become “Northrop Grumman. Guidance and Control Systems”.

    Google 'Litton 657650' leads to the “LN-12 inertial guidance platform and associated G-200 gyroscope”.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LN-3_Inertial_Navigation_System
    The LN-12 units were built and tested in the 1970s. (There are two orthogonal gyros inside the canister).
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LN-3_Inertial_Navigation_System#Genealogy

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inertial_navigation_system
    All these directional gyro units will have been removed from scrapped aircraft or replaced with triaxial fibre optic gyroscope units that have no moving parts. That would explain why it has been put aside and forgotten.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fibre_optic_gyroscope
     
  14. May 27, 2015 #13
    Wow, thanks!
     
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