What kinds of hobbies could I do with that involve math?

  • Thread starter Eclair_de_XII
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In summary: What about electronics and circuit design in general? This has been a hobby of mine for about 12 years and often requires linear algebra with a bit of calculus and diff-eq.In summary, people who take calculus (I-IV), proof-writing and logic-based mathematics, linear algebra, and differential equations may find graphic design uses some linear algebra, but I don't know how I would branch off from that. Otherwise, what hobbies could they pursue with these courses? One hobby people may pursue is game design, which uses physics. Another hobby may be interactive art, which uses programming. Additionally, people who have taken these courses may want to pursue
  • #1
Eclair_de_XII
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So far, I've taken:

Calculus (I - IV)
Proof-writing and Logic-based Mathematics
Linear Algebra
Intro to Ordinary Differential Equations
Application of Linear Algebra to Differential Equations

People say that graphic design uses some linear algebra, but I don't know how I would branch off from that.
Otherwise, what hobbies could I do with these math courses?
 
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  • #2
Hobbyist game design with physics comes to mind. You could also do interactive art using the Processing IDE in Java and your knowledge of math.
 
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  • #3
Does your university have a Robotics Club? You could get involved in robot/drone/autonomous vehicle design, and work on the control algorithms. That can be some pretty math-intensive stuff, especially when you are trying to optimize multi-variable systems...

Plus, you get to actually see the fruits of your labors come alive as moving machines that are using your algorithms... :smile:
 
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  • #4
Also mobile apps with machine learning features could be interesting to develop and do require knowledge of statistics and linear algebra and some calculus.
 
  • #5
With knowledge of those courses under your belt, anything related to programming would be a fun, stimulating, and rewarding endeavor. And, as mentioned above, robotics has programming, and programming has a couple of maths involved in the process. You can make good use of your knowledge to smoothly transition to the maths needed to program.
 
  • #6
The descriptions or listings given so far seem mostly academic. In case you have some employment experience which involved some less-advanced mathematics, you may want to write programs which you or a same-level colleague or other person would want to use for something that often come up in your job.

As one example, I once created a program (using a form of BASIC) which could take a very limited set of two dimensional data, like from a chem & phys handbook, and curve-fit a polynomial function to the data points. The key parts of the program were, unfortunately, hard-coded, since my linear algebra skill is not very advanced at all, so I made the program based on doing the linear system curve fitting steps on paper, to get the needed coefficients for the polynomial function. The program worked as a simulation for the curve for some boundary values of one of the variables (like the independent variable). Some/many members of this forum could probably do better.
 
  • #7
There's a marine robotics club at my university, but I don't think I'm skilled enough to understand the mechanics of how a boat would move through water. I don't have much confidence in my physics skills. But I do like the general programming suggestions everyone seems to be giving me. I took a course on basic C two years ago, but I likely forgot how to operate it after years of disuse. I only wonder what I would program... Like symbolipoint said, it might be a good idea to try programming something in my field of study, I think. So probability, then, since I'm studying to be an actuary.

symbolipoint said:
The key parts of the program were, unfortunately, hard-coded, since my linear algebra skill is not very advanced at all, so I made the program based on doing the linear system curve fitting steps on paper, to get the needed coefficients for the polynomial function.

I don't quite understand. So you would have needed linear algebra to "hard-code" your program into the compiler? How would you go about using linear algebra in modifying a compiler?
 
  • #8
What about electronics and circuit design in general? This has been a hobby of mine for about 12 years and often requires linear algebra with a bit of calculus and diff-eq.
 
  • #9
Eclair_de_XII said:
There's a marine robotics club at my university, but I don't think I'm skilled enough to understand the mechanics of how a boat would move through water. I don't have much confidence in my physics skills. But I do like the general programming suggestions everyone seems to be giving me. I took a course on basic C two years ago, but I likely forgot how to operate it after years of disuse. I only wonder what I would program... Like symbolipoint said, it might be a good idea to try programming something in my field of study, I think. So probability, then, since I'm studying to be an actuary.
I don't quite understand. So you would have needed linear algebra to "hard-code" your program into the compiler? How would you go about using linear algebra in modifying a compiler?
I made a thinking mistake. Like said, my linear algebra skills were and still are very very minimal. What I really did was that I took the two-d data from a handbook and used what was a free alternative application software at that time, and obtained the coefficients I needed using the alternative program. I then used those coefficients in MY program, which was created for simulating a curve for the two-d data. I might have tried some work on paper just to check some of the results; but I used the alternative software program to actually find the curve-fitting polynomial coefficients.
 

Related to What kinds of hobbies could I do with that involve math?

1. What are some fun hobbies that involve math?

Some fun hobbies that involve math include puzzles and brain teasers, coding and programming, creating mathematical art or designs, playing strategy games, and participating in math competitions or math clubs.

2. Can I pursue a hobby that involves math even if I am not good at math?

Yes, anyone can pursue a hobby that involves math regardless of their skill level. There are many resources available, such as online tutorials or classes, that can help improve math skills and make the hobby more enjoyable.

3. How can I incorporate math into my existing hobbies?

You can incorporate math into your existing hobbies by using math to track progress or statistics, applying mathematical concepts to solve challenges or problems, or even creating new mathematical variations of your hobby.

4. Are there any hobbies that involve math that I can do alone?

Yes, there are many hobbies that involve math that can be done alone, such as solving puzzles, coding and programming, and creating mathematical art or designs. These hobbies can also be done with others for added fun and collaboration.

5. Are there any benefits to having a hobby that involves math?

Yes, having a hobby that involves math can improve critical thinking, problem-solving, and analytical skills. It can also increase creativity and provide a sense of accomplishment. Additionally, many math-related hobbies can lead to potential career opportunities in fields such as engineering, finance, or data analysis.

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