Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

What kinds of vegetables are fatty and high in protein?

  1. Sep 25, 2010 #1
    Hey folks :smile:

    My girlfriend and I have a pet hairless rat named Hester. She is getting quite old and is in the final stages of her life. She can only eat soft mushy foods since her teeth have become quite worn down. We have been feeding her a diet that consists of grapes (skinned), bananas, baby food and cheerios soaked in water (to make sure she stays hydrated).

    I would like to make sure that she is getting enough fat and protein since she is getting skinnier by the day, even though she is still eating. Our vet says this is normal, but I would still like a healthy way to boost her fat and protein intake.

    I am thinking there should be some good beans out there that are high in protein and fat. Any recommendations? I do not know what constitutes as "high fat" for a vegetable. Is 1g (per human serving size) a lot?

    Any recommendations? They mushier the better! Nothing grainy, like peanuts or nuts as I cannot get them to a smooth consistency in the blender (yes, I have tried!).

    Thanks!

    And here is picture of Hester when she was younger so you know how cute she is!

    photo.jpg
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 25, 2010 #2

    Evo

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    aww, bless you Hester!

    Can she tolerate milk products? That might be a way to get more fat into her diet.
     
  4. Sep 25, 2010 #3

    Monique

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Soy beans and avocados? Can't you give her canned cat food? Cute picture!
     
  5. Sep 25, 2010 #4
    Yea, as Monique mentioned, avocados are very high in protein and fat
    100g (3.5oz) serving
    Fat Content: 14.66 g
    Saturated Fats: 2.13 g
    Protein: 2 g
    Although I suspect the rat won't have 100 g servings.
     
  6. Sep 25, 2010 #5

    Evo

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Can you find a way to mix natural peanut butter into food for her?
     
  7. Sep 25, 2010 #6


    I am weary of giving her meat and chicken products since she has never had them. I know that rats are supposed to be able to eat anything, but is it different for "domesticated" rats? Has the domestication process even had time to effect rat's digestive system? Probably not eh?
     
  8. Sep 25, 2010 #7
    We have given her cheese, so it is likely. I was thinking of getting her some of those Ensure shakes for older folks. The supplementary ones.

    It might be too sticky for her. I know my dog even has trouble eating peanut butter. Though I suppose if I mix the proportions well enough, it would be fine.
     
  9. Sep 25, 2010 #8

    Monique

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    A vegetarian rat, eh? :biggrin: I wouldn't give her too much cat food, if she hasn't had it before. I think it can be heavy on the kidneys and since she is already old..

    Soybeans are a good option, you should be able to find them in asian stores. If you don't find fresh/dried ones, you can also try tofu or tempeh. Evo's suggestion of peanut butter is good as well, just water it down to a more liquidly form so that it doesn't stick anymore.
     
  10. Sep 25, 2010 #9

    lisab

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    How about eggs, like scrambled eggs?
     
  11. Sep 26, 2010 #10
    She loves the avacadoes! :!!) I wish there was a way to alleviate her arthritis. Poor thing :frown: She is aging just like a human would, except in fast forward.
     
  12. Sep 26, 2010 #11
    buy raw peanuts and boil them.

    you could also make hummus.
     
  13. Sep 26, 2010 #12
    She loves hummus too! But, it was store bought that I happen to have. I do have a can of chick peas I could blend up. By the way, what does boiling the raw peanuts do? Just soften them up so I can puree them? I might try that. Seems like it would be less "sticky" than store-bought peanut butter.
     
  14. Sep 26, 2010 #13
    the peanuts will be a lot softer than roasted nuts. maybe she could chew them? i'm not sure how they would puree.
     
  15. Sep 26, 2010 #14
    Proton soup sounds delicious... I'm just kidding.
     
  16. Sep 26, 2010 #15
    it's got a bit of a bite to it (srs)
     
  17. Sep 26, 2010 #16
    Hmmm... Boil the peanuts, but don't puree... instead, mash them... it'll be less sticky.

    You could also make a pastiche of cheese, avocado, and the peanut mixture... remember, it's still going to taste fantastic to your little friend.

    I don't know how well it works, but you could probably include some minute quantity of painkiller in the chow... and it just so happens:

    http://ratguide.com/meds/nsaids/ibuprofen.php
    or in general:

    http://ratguide.com/meds/

    btw, cute little rat!

    edit: How about mashed lentils mixed with mashed chickpeas?
     
    Last edited: Sep 26, 2010
  18. Sep 26, 2010 #17

    Monique

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Yeah! :biggrin: She has some good owners looking after her. You can try dietary supplements of glucosamine and chondroitin to alleviate her arthritis.
     
  19. Sep 26, 2010 #18
    This rat definitely hit the karmic jackpot, so to speak.
     
  20. Oct 15, 2010 #19
    I was going to say the same thing as the others. Avocados are high in fat and are a good wonder food, full of nutrients.

    If you are concerned about protein, you can try adding some protein powder in the food. You can buy soy based protein powders at most health food stores.
     
  21. Oct 15, 2010 #20
    Lots of soy products available now.... soy cheeses, soy meats, veggie burgers, soy yogurts, etc., right there along with the tofu and tempeh. For a little extra fat, add a little olive oil to the meal. Olive oil is a healthy fat.... at least for humans.
     
Share this great discussion with others via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook