I What problems would 'black holes' not being formed solve?

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If you know that, why do you claim, that an "ever increasing finite time dilation" "is ifinite"? It always remains finite and defined.
That isn’t my wording, it is the OP’s. The OP’s wording is poor, but he is clearly (sloppily) refering to the infinite time dilation in the limit as you approach the event horizon. If you want to make an issue of his wording then take it up with him, not me. I won’t defend his wording, but I also don’t think it is worth correcting.
 
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I would like to add that from my previous post it seems that conclusion about physical situation might depend on the size of adopted coordinate chart.
The physical situation does not depend on the coordinate chart at all. That is the whole point of writing physics in terms of tensors.

However philosophers have not reached consensus how the paradox should be solved.
This isn’t a philosophy forum. However, this statement does shed light on why you have been posting as you have. Zeno’s Paradox is considered resolved in the scientific literature, don’t waste our time here please.
 
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That isn’t my wording, it is the OP’s.
"That is infinite." actually is your wording (see #67).

and with "This" you refer to

"OP does not say or suggest that he considers infinite time dilation as absurd. He said that ever increasing finite time dilation"

which is the wording of zonde and not the OP (again see #67).

The OP’s wording is poor, but he is clearly (sloppily) refering to the infinite time dilation in the limit as you approach the event horizon.
No he doesn't. He clearly assumes that this singularity will never be reached. That is equivalent to an always finite time dilation. If you do not see that, than you are actually missing the basic point of his idea.
 
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which is the wording of zonde and not the OP (again see #67).
Oops, Yes you are right. The OP actually said infinite time dilation in post 27, so in context @zonde was discussing infinite time dilation which I understood. So if you want to take issue with the wording then do so with him, not me or the OP.

No he doesn't. He clearly assumes that this singularity will never be reached. That is equivalent to an always finite time dilation. If you do not see that, than you are actually missing the basic point of his idea.
Read his post 27. He is clearly objecting to the infinite time dilation. He considers infinite time dilation to be absurd so he is making an argumentum ad absurdum argument against the formation of the horizon. I am not missing his point at all, I understand both his point and also the argument he is using to support his point. I am defending the correct rebuttal of his argument.
 
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So the obvious choice for distant observer is to keep his own time for coordinate chart.
How about setting the observer in the center and check if he will see the singularity formig before the black hole evaporates or not?
 
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Does anyone know the metric for the interior portion of the OS spacetime? Also, the coordinates of the event horizon in the interior portion?
 
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Read his post 27. He is clearly objecting to the infinite time dilation.
No, he doesn't. In #27 he says that he "don't see how time dilation could ever reach infinity at any point" and that the "the process would slow down, and prevent infinite time dilation occurring and hence a singularity" (highlighting by me). Please stop turning his argumentation into the opposite.
 
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Oh, sorry. I should have check before, what "objecting" actually means. Just forget my last post.
 

zonde

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I agree, so I would not pick that point. I would stay away from the center because that is where the singularity is and we expect our models to break down there. So pick another point where we expect the model to work, and all I said above applies.

We also do not pick the center of the Schwarzschild solution, so I was not even considering picking the center of the OS solution.
But singularity is not there from the start. Say look at this picture (taken from https://arxiv.org/abs/1201.3660):
bh.png

At first there is event horizon and only later singularity appears. In any case there is no singularity at the center of ordinary gravitating body. And it makes sense to pick the center as matter at rest at the center is not falling anywhere.
 

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zonde

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The physical situation does not depend on the coordinate chart at all. That is the whole point of writing physics in terms of tensors.
Do you mean that predictions of our models do not depend on chosen coordinate chart? Because obviously physical situation (reality) does not depend even from our models of physical situation, whether they are more or less correct or rather totally flawed.

But then maybe we are splitting hairs. If predictions are totally the same whether we describe collapsed stars as black holes or frozen stars, who cares what actually they are.
 
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Do you mean that predictions of our models do not depend on chosen coordinate chart?
Yes, that is a better way to say it.
If predictions are totally the same whether we describe collapsed stars as black holes or frozen stars, who cares what actually they are.
I don’t think the predictions of black holes or frozen stars are the same. I think a black hole described with one set of coordinates is the same as a black hole described with another set of coordinates.

This is addressing your comment that our conclusions about the physical situation depend on the size of the coordinate chart. I think that is wrong, and you don’t change a black hole into a frozen star simply by changing the size of the coordinate chart.
 
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But singularity is not there from the start. Say look at this picture (taken from https://arxiv.org/abs/1201.3660):
View attachment 229237
At first there is event horizon and only later singularity appears. In any case there is no singularity at the center of ordinary gravitating body. And it makes sense to pick the center as matter at rest at the center is not falling anywhere.
Ok, so this is a good picture to use. The event horizon has two sections. One section is the cylinder with straight edges going up off the top of the page, and the other section is a kind of round cap on the end of the cylinder.

The OPs objection was to infinite time dilation. I know that infinite time dilation occurs for the cylinder portion of the EH, but I don’t know if it occurs for the round cap section. So my comments above were discussing that section since it is the only section where I am sure that the OP’s argument arises.
 
We already discussed that above, it has already been resolved for some time now. As far as I know there is no current problem which would be resolved.
Thanks, but I don't see the paradox mentioned in this thread prior to my post. Could you point our where?
Also, I see several proposed resolutions to the black hole information paradox, but nothing saying it's definitely been resolved. Which solution do you mean?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_hole_information_paradox
 
Posts 1, 33, 35, 37.
Ah, thanks - the paradox is referred to as '"the information loss problem" in the original post and, as you mention, discussed in posts 33, 35, and 37.

Regarding the resolution of the paradox, though, from what I'm reading, it has not been resolved. For example:

"To resolve the paradox, one of the three postulates must be sacrificed, and nobody can agree on which one should get the axe. The simplest solution is to have the equivalence principle break down at the event horizon, thereby giving rise to a firewall. But several other possible solutions have been proposed in the ensuing years. ...
Physicists have yet to reach a consensus on any one of these proposed solutions. It’s a tribute to Hawking’s unique genius that they continue to argue about the black hole information paradox so many decades after his work first suggested it."
https://www.quantamagazine.org/stephen-hawkings-black-hole-paradox-keeps-physicists-puzzled-20180314/

The "famously resolved" resolution you describe seems to be the one where Hawking conceded the bet. But it looks like there is still no consensus overall.
 

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