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What to read about Quantum Spin liquid

  1. Nov 28, 2015 #1
    Hello
    I am joining as a Project assistant on a project called "Search for spin liquid and other novel ground states arising from an interplay between electronic correlations, spin-orbit coupling and geometric magnetic frustration"
    what can i read to get onto the topic for it.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 28, 2015 #2
  4. Nov 28, 2015 #3

    DrClaude

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    Staff: Mentor

    This is a Ph.D. position. They ask for knowledge of some techniques, but this doesn't mean that someone embarking on the project will know everything about the subject.

    To the OP: you should ask the people you will be working with.
     
  5. Nov 29, 2015 #4
  6. Nov 29, 2015 #5
    Yes, I deeply apologize, I was wrong.
     
  7. Dec 6, 2015 #6

    radium

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    Science Advisor
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    Are you trying to learn more about spin liquids?
     
  8. Dec 7, 2015 #7

    Student100

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    Gold Member

  9. Dec 7, 2015 #8

    radium

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    If you want to learn the foundation of SLs you should look at Wen's book quantum field theory of many-body systems, as well as the references to papers. There is also a book called Introduction to frustrated magnetism which has more about experiments.

    Topics you should note are frustration in the Heisenberg model, the large N limit/MF methods, RVB/BCS states and lattice gauge theories (most importantly confined and deconfined phase.

    SLs involve quite a profound formalism which makes it difficult to see what is exactly going on physically. That's why Wen's book is really good.

    Another thing to note is that there are very few SLs known to exist, the only one I can think of is Herbersmithite. However, there has been a lot of numerical work done recently with DMRG, variational Montecarlo, etc.

    My current research is in this field.
     
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