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What type of solid elements will not burn

  1. Mar 18, 2014 #1
    what type of sold elements will not burn.....even in the highest heat temperature..
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 18, 2014 #2
    Oxygen?

    You mean "solid" or "sold" (which you can buy)?
    If it is solid, they will stop being solid in the "highest heat temperature". So it does not really make sense.
     
  4. Mar 18, 2014 #3
    A lot of things will burn in a high oxygen atmosphere. (Do you count fluorine reaction as burning? Fluorine is even more reactive.) But a simple answer is that something that is already burned (like ash or rust, various oxides) won't burn.
     
  5. Mar 18, 2014 #4

    sophiecentaur

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    Can you think of any substance that remains a solid at 'the highest heat temperature'?
     
  6. Mar 18, 2014 #5
    Yes. But will Oxygen burn in a high oxygen atmosphere?:)
     
  7. Mar 18, 2014 #6

    sophiecentaur

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    If the temperature is high enough, the atoms will all become ionised and you will have a Plasma. Chemistry-wise, all bets are off and Chemical reactions will not take place as molecules won't be formed.
     
  8. Mar 20, 2014 #7
    I mean solid elements from the periodic table.....
     
  9. Mar 20, 2014 #8

    UltrafastPED

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    Just look up tables of oxides - if an element doesn't appear as an oxide, then it doesn't burn.

    Some (e.g., aluminum, sodium) are extremely reactive and are never found in pure form unless protected from oxygen.

    See http://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_oxides
     
  10. Mar 20, 2014 #9
    can you give some examples ...
     
  11. Mar 20, 2014 #10

    Nugatory

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    Helium: doesn't form an oxide, so doesn't burn.
    Iron: does form an oxide, so will burn if the conditions are right. That's how an oxyacetylene cutitng torch works.

    (you may object that only one of those is a solid - but depending on the temperature and pressure they both could be either solid, liquid, or gas).

    It's worth pointing out that you specified elements that won't burn, as opposed to compounds. That's a somewhat odd constraint, as most of our fireproof materials are not elements - instead we look for compounds that don't react readily with oxygen because they're already strongly oxidized (not necessarily with oxygen).
     
  12. Mar 20, 2014 #11
    Taking the question at face value, the answer is none. All elements that are solid at room temperature will burn.
     
  13. Mar 20, 2014 #12

    sophiecentaur

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    Is there any point to this thread? It's beginning to resemble a game of Top Trumps.
     
  14. Mar 20, 2014 #13
    I don't think I know that game. how does it go?
     
  15. Mar 20, 2014 #14

    sophiecentaur

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    It's a card game. There must be dozens of available subjects. Each card in the pack pack has a list of characteristics of, say, different models of car. Top speed, age, engine size, number of seats etc.. One player picks a card - say speed = 100mph and the other player has to find a card that beats speed = 100 mph. If he can, he gets both cards and its his turn. To win, you need to know which feature of each card is a possible winner - so a 1908 Austin will beat a 1998 Porsche on age but the Porsch will win on top speed. It suits boys with a 'catalogue' mind and dads are hopeless at it because they don't know all the cards like their son does. You learn the statistics but nothing about the way motor cars work.
     
  16. Mar 20, 2014 #15

    russ_watters

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    A periodic table doesn't tell you if elements are solids at high temperatures. That's a critical flaw in your question that you still seem to be missing: solids aren't solids at high temperature.
     
  17. Mar 21, 2014 #16
    which element is hard to burn . ..calcium or lithium....and why.

    ..
     
  18. Mar 21, 2014 #17
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fwv7egAz71M

    None of them is "hard" to burn.
    But of course it would depend on what do you mean by "hard".
    You can "burn" them in the flame of a gas burner.



     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 25, 2014
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