What would happen if a big superfluid cloud eclipses the Sun?

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Imagine a big superfluid cloud the size of the Moon, at the same distance of the Moon in front of the Sun. A total eclipse of 7 minutes.
What would happen with the light coming from the sun during these 7 minutes?
Would we see a "night sun"?

Another question.
"Estimates of the photon travel time range between 10,000 and 170,000 years"
Could the center of the sun be in a superfluid state? Cold???
 

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  • #2
davenn
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and what scientific evidence to you base the existance of some superfluid ?

Please try and keep within known scientific understanding,

Estimates of the photon travel time range between 10,000 and 170,000 years"
from where to where ?

it does take light 150,000 - 170,000 to get to us from with the Large or Small Magellanic Clouds ... ie. they are ~ 160,000 light years from us

Dave
 
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phinds
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from where to where ?
I think he's talking about the time for a photon to propagate from the center of the sun to the outside, which I believe is normally taken as about 100,000 years.
 
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and what scientific evidence to you base the existance of some superfluid ?

Please try and keep within known scientific understanding,
Superfluid is a state of matter. I just said "imagine" because I´m curious about the effect that we will perceive.


from where to where ?
From the center of the sun to the outside.
 
  • #5
phinds
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.... I just said "imagine" because I´m curious about the effect that we will perceive.
.
That's a lot like asking "If unicorns existed, would their horns be long or short?" Not really the kind of thing this forum is big on. We're more into discussion of established science.
 
  • #6
K^2
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Superfluids don't affect light in any special ways that I know of.

phinds said:
I think he's talking about the time for a photon to propagate from the center of the sun to the outside, which I believe is normally taken as about 100,000 years.
Considering how many times that energy is absorbed, re-emitted, absorbed again, transferred in collisions, carried by convection, and so on, do you really think it's fair to say that it's time it takes a photon to propagate?
 
  • #7
phinds
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Considering how many times that energy is absorbed, re-emitted, absorbed again, transferred in collisions, carried by convection, and so on, do you really think it's fair to say that it's time it takes a photon to propagate?
I am just repeating what I have read about this. Propogate may be a poor choice of words for the process, but I don't know a better one. I certainly do not mean that I think a single specific photon move from inside to outside, taking 100,000 years.
 

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