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When does an accelerated electron not radiate?

  1. Oct 28, 2006 #1
    Classical electrodynamics assumes that any charged particle that has a non-zero acceleration is, all the time, radiating energy even if most of the time the energy loss is far too small to detect. Anyone who accepts the physical existence of stationary states rejects the “all the time” assumption.

    I would read quantum mechanics as saying “If with no change in the velocity of the particle there is no attainable state of lower energy there will be no radiation?”

    Is this correct?

    Phil Gardner
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 28, 2006 #2

    ZapperZ

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    Please read our FAQ in the General Physics section.

    Zz.
     
  4. Oct 28, 2006 #3
    How does one find your FAQ? A search for "FAQ" turns up nothing. A title search for "Freqently" or "asked" turns up nothing relevant.

    Phil Gardner
     
  5. Oct 28, 2006 #4

    ZapperZ

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    Er... as was mentioned, go to the General Physics forum. One of the stickied thread is titled "Physics Forums FAQ".

    Zz.
     
  6. Oct 29, 2006 #5
    what a rat guy zapperz
     
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