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When will antibosons be generated?

  1. Apr 29, 2015 #1
    Will normal matter generate anti-bosons such as an anti-W+boson or anti W-boson or anti Z boson? When and why? thanks
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 29, 2015 #2

    e.bar.goum

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    An "anti-W+ boson" is a W- boson, and vice-versa. The W bosons are each other's antiparticles. The Z boson is it's own antiparticle.

    As such, you'll see a "anti-W+ boson" whenever you'd expect to see a W-, because, you know, they're the same thing.
     
  4. Apr 29, 2015 #3
    okay thanks I wasn't quite sure =) So presumably you mean the spin and mass are the same but the charge is positive or negative but the same value either way.

    But I am still not clear about which situation would generate a W+ or a W-

    Also, do W+ and a W- ever collide in the atom? If so, what would be produced?
    The same question for the Z0 particle - do they collide and what would be produced?

    Two photons in all three cases?
     
  5. Apr 29, 2015 #4

    e.bar.goum

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    I mean that by the definition of antiparticles -- that the electromagnetic charge is reversed -- an anti-W+ boson is the same as a W- boson, since they are identical in every other respect. The electromagnetic charge reversed W+ boson is a W-. Since the Z boson is neutral, it must be its own antiparticle!

    The W and Z bosons are the gauge bosons for the weak force. That is, they are the force carriers for the weak force, just like a photon carries the EM force, and the gluon carries the strong force. So they'll appear any time a weak interaction occurs, like beta-decay in the nucleus, for example. But they won't stick around and be "produced" in any real sense. Further, you can't really think about them being "in the atom" for them to collide.
     
  6. Apr 29, 2015 #5
    And neutron is its own antiparticle, because it is neutral?
    And neutrino is its own antiparticle, because it is neutral?
    ;)
     
  7. Apr 29, 2015 #6

    e.bar.goum

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    Nope! Quark composition, etc.

    Maybe!

    But you're correct, I was imprecise. I should have emphasized that this is not in general true. (but applies to the neutral gauge bosons)
     
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