Heavier bosons and their function and detection

In summary: W and H are like a buddhist monk. They have a very low ground state, but need a lot of external excitation to get excited.
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Ranku
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Heavier bosons like ##W## or ##H## require high energy accelerator to be detected. Yet these bosons fulfill their function in the ambient energy of the universe. Why is it that their detection takes high energy environment but their function is possible in lower ambient energy?
 
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  • #2
Ranku said:
Heavier bosons like ##W## or ##H## require high energy accelerator to be detected.

They require a high energy experiment to be detected as separate particles. They do not require a high energy environment to function as quantum fields.
 
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  • #3
PeterDonis said:
They require a high energy experiment to be detected as separate particles. They do not require a high energy environment to function as quantum fields.
So can these quantum fields be equivalently seen as virtual particles, that become real detectable particles upon the impartation of high energy?
 
  • #5
Ranku said:
So can these quantum fields be equivalently seen as virtual particles,

No, these are different (but of course related) concepts. "Virtual particle" is a name for certain part of mathematics that we use when we do perturbative calculations. And this is the only place where virtual particles appear. Quantum fields are basic objects in QFT and trying to think that they can be equivalently seen as something else is not a good idea. You replace one relatively hard concept with other which you think is easier to grasp, and it's not. Fields are fields. Virtual particles are virtual particles, and real particles are yet another concept - a very specific states of the field. You can't mix those three concepts, they are important all by their own.
 
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  • #6
PeterDonis said:
They require a high energy experiment to be detected as separate particles. They do not require a high energy environment to function as quantum fields.
W and H are like a buddhist monk. They have a very low ground state, but need a lot of external excitation to get excited. :oldbiggrin:
 
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Related to Heavier bosons and their function and detection

1. What are bosons?

Bosons are a type of elementary particle that have integer spin, meaning they have a whole number value for their intrinsic angular momentum. They are one of the two main categories of subatomic particles, the other being fermions.

2. Why are heavier bosons important?

Heavier bosons are important because they provide evidence for the existence of the Higgs field, which is responsible for giving particles mass. The discovery of heavier bosons can help us better understand the fundamental forces of the universe and the nature of matter.

3. How are heavier bosons detected?

Heavier bosons are detected using particle accelerators, such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. These accelerators use powerful magnets to accelerate particles to high speeds and then collide them, producing a variety of subatomic particles, including heavier bosons. Scientists can then analyze the data to identify the presence of these particles.

4. What is the function of heavier bosons?

The function of heavier bosons is to carry the fundamental forces of nature, such as the strong and weak nuclear forces. They also play a role in the process of particle decay and the formation of atoms and molecules.

5. Are there any practical applications of studying heavier bosons?

Studying heavier bosons can lead to a better understanding of the fundamental forces of nature, which can have practical applications in fields such as technology and medicine. For example, the discovery of the Higgs boson has led to advancements in medical imaging technology.

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