Where did the energy of red shifted CMB go?

In summary, the conversation discusses the concept of energy being lost when red shifting a gamma CMB into a microwave CMB. The individuals cannot agree on where the energy goes and question if it is possible to give energy to space without it impacting the expansion of space. The blog post mentioned explains that energy is not conserved in General Relativity.
  • #1
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i know it sounds stupid, but i can't seem to find an answer to it

where did the energy went? you can't just just destroy energy, but when you red shift a gamma CMB into a microwave CMB, the energy has go to go somewhere...?
it's not like one gamma photo spitted into many microwave, cause that would make CMB not very smooth

i mean, I've just got no clue, normally, when red shift is from an object, you can say that momenta is given to the object receding or something, but you can't really give energy to space and expect it to do nothing...?
and according to my very rudimentary calculations with a lot of assumptions, the amount of energy lost would still, be not enough to expand space at all, so if it's not expanding space, where did the energy go?

thankyou
 
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  • #3
In general energy is not conserved in General Relativity. So the energy is simply lost.
 

What is the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) and how is it related to redshift?

The Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) is a remnant of the radiation that was released shortly after the Big Bang and is present throughout the entire universe. It is essentially the oldest light in the universe and is a key piece of evidence for the Big Bang theory. The CMB is related to redshift because as the universe expands, the light from the CMB gets stretched, resulting in a shift towards the red end of the electromagnetic spectrum.

How does the redshift of the CMB impact our understanding of the universe?

The redshift of the CMB provides important information about the expansion of the universe and its age. By studying the redshift, scientists can estimate the age of the universe, the rate at which it is expanding, and the amount of dark energy present. This allows us to better understand the evolution of the universe and its current state.

Where did the energy of the redshifted CMB go?

The energy of the redshifted CMB did not go anywhere. It is still present in the universe, but its energy has been stretched due to the expansion of the universe. This means that the CMB has a longer wavelength and lower energy compared to when it was first released after the Big Bang.

Can we detect the energy of the redshifted CMB?

Yes, we can detect the energy of the redshifted CMB using specialized instruments such as telescopes and detectors. These instruments are designed to detect microwave radiation and can pick up the faint signals from the CMB. By studying the energy of the CMB, scientists can gather important information about the early universe and its evolution.

How does the energy of the redshifted CMB affect the temperature of the universe?

The energy of the redshifted CMB contributes to the overall temperature of the universe. As the universe expands, the temperature of the CMB decreases due to the stretching of its wavelengths. This means that the temperature of the universe is also decreasing over time. Currently, the temperature of the CMB is approximately 2.73 Kelvin.

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