Where Did the Universe's Antimatter Go?

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In summary: What is clear, however, is that there is a significant imbalance between matter and antimatter in the universe. This is known as the baryon asymmetry problem, and it is one of the biggest unsolved mysteries in physics. There are various theories and hypotheses that attempt to explain this imbalance, but so far, none have been confirmed. Some possible explanations include the violation of CP symmetry, the effects of inflation, and the existence of new particles beyond the Standard Model. However, the exact reason for this imbalance remains a subject of ongoing research and debate in the scientific community. In summary, the question of why we don't see the same amount of matter and antimatter in the universe is a complex and still unanswered question in the field of cosm
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If the universe was born from nothing then what are the possible reasons that we don’t see the same amount of matter and antimatter now?(if it’s a scientifically correct question)
 
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Pouya Pourkarim said:
If the universe was born from nothing
It is unclear if that is a useful description.
Pouya Pourkarim said:
then what are the possible reasons that we don’t see the same amount of matter and antimatter now?
There is tons of literature about it. What did you read so far?
Your question is very general, and it doesn't make sense to write books about it here because these books have been written already. As basic introduction, the Wikipedia article isn't a bad start.
 
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Pouya Pourkarim said:
If the universe was born from nothing ...
As mfb already pointed out, it was not. Saying that it was is a widespread version in all pop-science presentations. The actual current model of Cosmology, the Big Bang Theory, is silent about any creation event. That is, we have a verifiable theory of what the universe was like at a point in the past and how it evolved to what it is today but we do not know what was going on previous to that point in time (and that point in time is NOT a creation event, it's a time when the universe was an incredibly dense, incredibly hot, plasma of unknown (possibly infinite) extent
 
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1. Where did the antimatter in the universe come from?

The origin of antimatter in the universe is still a mystery. It is believed that equal amounts of matter and antimatter were created during the Big Bang, but somehow most of the antimatter disappeared, leaving behind the matter that makes up our world.

2. How do scientists know that there is less antimatter than matter in the universe?

Scientists can detect the presence of antimatter by observing the particles it creates when it comes into contact with matter. Through various experiments and observations, it has been determined that there is a significant imbalance between matter and antimatter in the universe.

3. What happened to the antimatter that vanished from the universe?

There are various theories about what happened to the missing antimatter, but the most widely accepted one is that it was annihilated with matter shortly after the Big Bang. This process of annihilation produces energy, which can be observed in the form of cosmic rays.

4. Is it possible to create antimatter in a laboratory?

Yes, scientists have been able to create antimatter in particle accelerators, but in very small amounts. It is a challenging and expensive process, as antimatter is highly unstable and difficult to contain. It is also quickly annihilated when it comes into contact with matter.

5. Could the missing antimatter have an impact on the fate of the universe?

It is unlikely that the missing antimatter will have a significant impact on the fate of the universe. The remaining matter is enough to continue the expansion of the universe, and the small amounts of antimatter that are still present do not pose a threat. However, further research on the nature of antimatter could provide valuable insights into the fundamental laws of the universe.

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