Why a D-D reaction in the Divertor Tokamak Test Facility?

In summary, the proposed DTT project in Italy, Frascati has chosen to use D-D reactions due to their smaller cross section, lower neutron production, and potential benefits for heat and particle exhaust on the divertor.
  • #1
Giuliavaleria
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The DTT project proposal talks about a D-D reaction inside the future tokamak that is going to be built in Italy, Frascati. Which is the reason of this choise? The cross section is smaller than the D-T reaction one, and neutrons are less energetic. How this influences heat and particle exhaust on the divertor? and how does the heat flux changes?
Thanks
 
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  • #2
It is a divertor test facility. The divertor is mainly hit by ions from the plasma. While it is also hit by some neutrons that plays a smaller role. The DTT won't have any relevant fusion as far as I understand.

Tritium is more difficult to work with, unless there is a strong reason to do so operation with deuterium is easier.
 
  • #3
for your question! The reason for choosing a D-D reaction in the proposed DTT project is likely due to a combination of factors. Firstly, the cross section for D-D reactions is smaller than that of D-T reactions, meaning that a larger number of fuel particles can be confined in the tokamak without causing excessive energy loss. This is important for achieving the high temperatures and pressures necessary for fusion reactions to occur. Additionally, using D-D reactions produces fewer neutrons compared to D-T reactions, which can be beneficial for the long-term operation and maintenance of the tokamak.

In terms of heat and particle exhaust on the divertor, using D-D reactions may result in a lower heat flux compared to D-T reactions. This is because the neutrons produced in D-D reactions have lower energy compared to those produced in D-T reactions, and therefore, less heat is carried away by the neutrons. However, this also means that the heat flux may be more evenly distributed across the divertor, reducing the risk of damage to the divertor components.

Overall, the choice of using D-D reactions in the DTT project likely takes into account a variety of factors, including the cross section, neutron production, and heat flux distribution. Each of these factors plays a role in achieving efficient and sustainable fusion reactions in the tokamak. I hope this helps to answer your question!
 

1. Why is a D-D reaction used in the Divertor Tokamak Test Facility?

The D-D (deuterium-deuterium) reaction is used in the Divertor Tokamak Test Facility because it is a type of fusion reaction that is relatively easy to achieve and control. Deuterium is an isotope of hydrogen that is abundant in seawater, making it a readily available fuel source for fusion reactions. Using deuterium also eliminates the production of radioactive waste, making it a safer and more environmentally-friendly option for fusion experiments.

2. How does a D-D reaction work in the Divertor Tokamak Test Facility?

In the Divertor Tokamak Test Facility, deuterium ions are heated to extremely high temperatures (around 100 million degrees Celsius) and then injected into a plasma chamber. The intense heat causes the ions to collide and fuse together, releasing large amounts of energy in the form of heat and light. This energy can then be harnessed and used to generate electricity.

3. What are the advantages of using a D-D reaction in the Divertor Tokamak Test Facility?

Using a D-D reaction in the Divertor Tokamak Test Facility has several advantages. It is a relatively simple and safe fusion reaction to achieve and control, and it does not produce any radioactive waste. Deuterium fuel is also abundant and easily accessible, making it a cost-effective option for fusion experiments. Additionally, D-D reactions have the potential to produce large amounts of energy, making them a promising candidate for future energy production.

4. What challenges are associated with a D-D reaction in the Divertor Tokamak Test Facility?

One of the main challenges with a D-D reaction in the Divertor Tokamak Test Facility is achieving and maintaining the extremely high temperatures and pressures needed for fusion to occur. This requires advanced technology and precise control of the plasma. Additionally, D-D reactions produce high-energy neutrons, which can be damaging to the materials used in the fusion reactor. Researchers are working on developing materials that can withstand these conditions and minimize the damage.

5. How does the Divertor Tokamak Test Facility contribute to the development of fusion energy?

The Divertor Tokamak Test Facility is a vital tool in the development of fusion energy. As a large-scale fusion experiment, it allows scientists to study and test different fusion reactions and technologies in a controlled environment. By using a D-D reaction, researchers can gather valuable data and insights that can inform the design and construction of future fusion reactors. Ultimately, the goal of the Divertor Tokamak Test Facility is to help pave the way for the development of practical and sustainable fusion energy sources.

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