Why do metals in metal carbonyls have 0 OS?

In summary, the oxidation state of metals in metal carbonyls is 0 because it is a hypothetical value for the charge of the individual species in an ionic compound. However, carbonyls are not ionic, so the metals in them do not donate electrons. They may do so in other compounds, but not in carbonyls.
  • #1
takando12
123
5
That's pretty much it. Why do they have 0 Oxidation state?
 
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  • #2
Why not?
 
  • #3
Borek said:
Why not?
Oxidation number is like a hypothetical value for the charge of the individual species if a compound was considered ionic(atleast that's what i understood).
So when we say the OS of metals in metal carbonyls is 0, are we saying that they can never donate any electrons? I am confused , i don't understand.
 
  • #4
takando12 said:
if a compound was considered ionic

Carbonyls aren't ionic.

takando12 said:
So when we say the OS of metals in metal carbonyls is 0, are we saying that they can never donate any electrons?

Why 'never'? They don't in carbonyls, they do in other compounds.
 

Related to Why do metals in metal carbonyls have 0 OS?

Why do metals in metal carbonyls have 0 OS?

Metal carbonyls are compounds that consist of a metal atom bonded to one or more carbon monoxide molecules. The metal in these compounds always has an oxidation state (OS) of 0. This means that it has an equal number of positive and negative charges. Here are the 5 most frequently asked questions about why metals in metal carbonyls have 0 OS.

1. What is the oxidation state of a metal in a metal carbonyl?

The oxidation state of a metal in a metal carbonyl is always 0. This is because the metal atom is bonded to carbon monoxide molecules, which are neutral and have an oxidation state of 0. Since the metal atom has an equal number of positive and negative charges, its oxidation state is also 0.

2. Why do metals in metal carbonyls have an oxidation state of 0?

The bonds between the metal atom and the carbon monoxide molecules in a metal carbonyl are considered to be covalent, rather than ionic. This means that the electrons in the bond are shared equally between the metal and the carbon monoxide. As a result, the metal atom does not gain or lose any electrons and its oxidation state remains at 0.

3. Can the oxidation state of a metal in a metal carbonyl ever be different from 0?

No, the oxidation state of a metal in a metal carbonyl is always 0. Even if the metal in the compound is known to have a different oxidation state in other compounds, it will have an oxidation state of 0 in a metal carbonyl due to the nature of the covalent bond with carbon monoxide.

4. How does the oxidation state of a metal affect its properties in a metal carbonyl?

The oxidation state of a metal does not significantly affect its properties in a metal carbonyl. This is because the metal is still able to form bonds with other molecules and participate in chemical reactions, despite having a 0 oxidation state.

5. Are there any exceptions to metals having a 0 oxidation state in metal carbonyls?

No, there are no exceptions to this rule. All metals in metal carbonyls will have an oxidation state of 0 due to the covalent nature of the bonds with carbon monoxide.

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