Why do people associate red with hot and blue with cold

In summary, the conversation discusses the relationship between color and temperature. While red is often associated with heat, there are fewer examples of blue being associated with cold. This could be due to the fact that blue is seen as the absence of red, rather than a specific indicator of cold. Additionally, the conversation touches on the concept of infrared heat and how our skin is not sensitive to visible light, which is why we perceive it as heat.
  • #1
jaydnul
558
15
When in reality, blue light is the higher energy.
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
Because people's intuition is more a matter of biology and sociology than it is a matter of physics.
 
  • #3
Fire is kind of red, ice is kind of bluish?
 
  • #4
Perhaps because fire, bonfires are red-yellow. Embers are red. Hot metal is red. Volcanoes lava is red...

On the other hand. Ice is sometimes bluish. Cloudy days are of higher color temperature, this is more bluish. The sea is blue.

The heat is infrared and we are not sensitive to light (except for the eyes). Too much visible light on our skin are turned into infrared and this is why we notice its energy.

Simon.
 
  • #5
bubal said:
Perhaps because fire, bonfires are red-yellow. Embers are red. Hot metal is red. Volcanoes lava is red...

On the other hand. Ice is sometimes bluish. Cloudy days are of higher color temperature, this is more bluish. The sea is blue.

The heat is infrared and we are not sensitive to light (except for the eyes). Too much visible light on our skin are turned into infrared and this is why we notice its energy.

Simon.

I see numerous examples of red being associated with hot, but there are fewer examples of blue being cold. I think it may be more along the lines of "not hot" is cold and "not red" is blue.
 

Related to Why do people associate red with hot and blue with cold

What is the reason behind people associating red with hot and blue with cold?

The main reason behind this association is due to cultural and societal influences. Red is often associated with fire, warmth, and passion, while blue is associated with water, ice, and calmness.

Does this association have any scientific basis?

Yes, there is a scientific basis for this association. The color red is perceived as being closer to the electromagnetic spectrum of visible light, which is associated with heat and warmth. On the other hand, the color blue is perceived as being closer to the ultraviolet end of the spectrum, which is associated with coldness.

Are there any biological factors that contribute to this association?

Yes, there are biological factors that contribute to this association. Our eyes have specialized cells called cones that are responsible for color vision. These cones are more sensitive to light in the red and blue parts of the spectrum, which could contribute to the association of these colors with hot and cold.

Do different cultures have different associations with colors and temperature?

Yes, different cultures can have different associations with colors and temperature. For example, in some cultures, the color white is associated with coldness, while in others it is associated with purity and cleanliness. These cultural differences can affect how people perceive and associate colors with temperature.

Is this association consistent across all individuals?

No, this association may not be consistent across all individuals. Factors such as personal experiences, emotions, and individual perceptions can influence how a person associates colors with temperature. Additionally, color associations can also vary based on context and cultural background.

Similar threads

Replies
7
Views
4K
  • Other Physics Topics
Replies
3
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
18
Views
798
  • Feedback and Announcements
Replies
8
Views
1K
  • Other Physics Topics
Replies
3
Views
2K
  • Other Physics Topics
Replies
4
Views
11K
Replies
13
Views
1K
  • Classical Physics
Replies
1
Views
1K
Replies
5
Views
1K
  • Other Physics Topics
Replies
1
Views
1K
Back
Top