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Why does compression of a nerve cause any kind of feeling at all?

  1. Nov 1, 2014 #1
    Is it because the charges in the nerve are being pushed away from the compressed area, thus sending electrical signal along the nerve?

    Why was my post moved from physics forum to biology forum? This question could be classified as both physics and biology as I am asking about charges.

    What's the difference between physics and biology?
     
    Last edited: Nov 1, 2014
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 1, 2014 #2

    berkeman

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    Do you have a mainstream reference that suggests the compression of different kinds of nerves can cause pain? Normally that would cause numbness and maybe tingling...
     
  4. Nov 1, 2014 #3
    Yes sorry, that was my incorrect use of the word. I have edited the title*.

    My question is: Why does compression of a nerve cause any kind of feeling at all?

    *The title was originally: Why does compression of a nerve cause pain?
     
    Last edited: Nov 1, 2014
  5. Nov 1, 2014 #4

    Ygggdrasil

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  6. Nov 1, 2014 #5

    berkeman

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    Well, compression of an area will restrict blood flow, which will impair nerve function. I'm not sure if compression will inhibit ionic flow at nerve junctions...

    EDIT -- Ygggdrasil beat me to it.. :-)
     
  7. Nov 1, 2014 #6
    Thanks both
     
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