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Why does the universe has such a huge amount of Energy?

  1. Nov 6, 2008 #1
    Y accept the existence of the universe and the existence of effective energy within it, but, is there a reason because of the incalculable (hope the word exists) amount of that energy? I know that this question is more philosophical than physical... but maybe someone can give some sort of answer...
     
    Last edited: Nov 6, 2008
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  3. Nov 6, 2008 #2

    Ivan Seeking

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    I was going to move this to an approriate forum, but I don't understand your question.
     
  4. Nov 6, 2008 #3
    Then erase it, maybe a stupid question, but I thought some could tell something about big-bang.
    Why does exists millions of millions of millions of stars intead of just 1?
    Maybe is definetly a stupid question, like Why is the universe so powerfull?... and,

    Does the universe have a finite energy?

    That is the most clear version of my question.
     
  5. Nov 6, 2008 #4
    Well think about it as "normalization". Our universe has as much energy as a universe is supposed to have. There is nothing to compare it to. Its like asking why there are so many blades of grass in a field. Its a huge number, but you really can't judge. You cannot compare a number to "1" and say whether it is large or not. Is 2 a large number of eyes? Is 6 billion a large number of people? etc.

    Just because a number is "astronomical" does not mean it is extraordinary. The universe right now has exactly the amount of stars it COULD have had. No more, no less.
     
  6. Nov 7, 2008 #5

    Ivan Seeking

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    No problem. I just didn't quite understand what you meant.
     
  7. Nov 7, 2008 #6
    You're right, but in all earth we can assume that the number of grass blades is finite... can we assume the same for the energy of the universe?
     
  8. Nov 7, 2008 #7
    Energy can not be created or destroyed, it can only be changed from one form to another, or passed from one body to another, but the total amount of energy remains constant.

    So, even a little energy is infinite.
     
  9. Nov 7, 2008 #8
    It does seem like an interesting question in that I'd be interested in hearing speculation on what the result of the universe having more or less energy would be. It would effect cosmic inflation behavior at least, right?
     
  10. Nov 7, 2008 #9

    Ivan Seeking

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    To the best of our knowledge, yes.
     
  11. Nov 7, 2008 #10

    mgb_phys

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    Why the universe contains this particular mass is a very good question.
    There is no reason (that we know about) that the initial singularity couldn't create a universe of any mass.

    It could simply be that there are (were/is/will-be - English cases don't really cope with multiple universes) many universes of different masses, life can only exist if they have a certain size and so we observe only the universe that we could observe.
     
  12. Nov 7, 2008 #11

    Ivan Seeking

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    There is one hypothesis floating around that has universes constantly bubbling up in a process of infinite creation, but only those universes having critically valued physical constants, such as the total energy of the universe, can exist.

    It has often been noted that were the physical constants slighty different than what we find, the universe as we know it could not exist.
     
    Last edited: Nov 8, 2008
  13. Nov 8, 2008 #12

    Ivan Seeking

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    On a related note, this was in the news today, but I don"t see a formal publication listed yet, so even the modeling of the hard data, not to mention grand interpretations of that data, have to be taken with a grain of salt for now.

    http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2008/11/081105-dark-flow.html
     
  14. Nov 8, 2008 #13
    Pish! Dark flows are so September 2008.
     
  15. Nov 8, 2008 #14

    Ivan Seeking

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    I'm not surprised. I have been completely preoccupied with the election.
     
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