Why Is a Minus Term Used in the Moment of Inertia Calculation for a T-Beam?

In summary, the conversation is discussing the calculation of the moment of inertia in an old report about a beam. The report uses the normal procedure of calculating the moment of inertia of a t-beam part by part and solving the problem using m.c/I. The question is about an extra minus term that is added to the calculation, which may be related to the parallel axis theorem. The speaker would like to see the full calculation, even if they don't fully understand it.
  • #1
teodorakis
88
0
Hi i tried to understand an old report about a beam, in the report maximum normal force due to bending is investigated , the normal procedure is applied nothing special actually they calculate the moment of inertia of a t-beam part by part and from m.c/I they solve the problem. I want to ask that in the calculation of moment of inertia an extra minus term which they added all the first moment of inertias and multiplied it by the center of mass value, what's this term is all about? i really doesn't see this term in any kind of inertia calculation.
Thank you for your help.
 
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  • #2
It would help if you would present this calculation in full, just copy is down even if you don't fully understand it.

It sounds like this may be an application of the parallel axis theorem in order to combine all of the individual area MOI values into a single value referred to the area centroid.
 
  • #3
OldEngr63 said:
It would help if you would present this calculation in full, just copy is down even if you don't fully understand it.

It sounds like this may be an application of the parallel axis theorem in order to combine all of the individual area MOI values into a single value referred to the area centroid.

thank you for your kind response, i think it's like you said related with paralle axis theorem and they neglect the square and take only the term that i mention, it's nothing new:), i mean.
 

Related to Why Is a Minus Term Used in the Moment of Inertia Calculation for a T-Beam?

1. What is the moment of inertia minus term?

The moment of inertia minus term, also known as the reduced moment of inertia, is a mathematical term used in physics to describe the rotational inertia of a rigid body. It is the difference between the total moment of inertia and the mass moment of inertia of a body, and represents the distribution of mass around an axis of rotation.

2. How is the moment of inertia minus term calculated?

The moment of inertia minus term can be calculated using the formula Ir = It - Im, where Ir is the reduced moment of inertia, It is the total moment of inertia, and Im is the mass moment of inertia. This formula takes into account the distribution of mass and the distance of each mass element from the axis of rotation.

3. What is the significance of the moment of inertia minus term?

The moment of inertia minus term is an important concept in rotational dynamics as it affects the rotational motion of a body. A lower reduced moment of inertia means that the mass is more concentrated around the axis of rotation, resulting in a faster rotational motion. On the other hand, a higher reduced moment of inertia means that the mass is more spread out, leading to a slower rotational motion.

4. How does the moment of inertia minus term affect the stability of a body?

The moment of inertia minus term is directly related to the stability of a body. A lower reduced moment of inertia means that the body has a lower resistance to rotational motion, making it less stable. In contrast, a higher reduced moment of inertia provides more resistance to rotational motion, making the body more stable.

5. Can the moment of inertia minus term be negative?

No, the moment of inertia minus term cannot be negative. This is because it is a physical property of a body and represents the distribution of mass around an axis of rotation. Therefore, it can only have a positive or zero value, depending on the shape and mass distribution of the body.

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