Withdrawls and grad school applications

In summary, the individual is transferring from engineering to computer science and may have three withdrawals this term due to not enjoying the courses and them not being program requirements. They are still considered a full-time student, the withdrawals will appear on their transcript, and they do not have to withdraw from the courses now. The courses they are withdrawing from are Chemical Process Analysis, Engineering Thermodynamics, and Science and Technology studies. They will also receive a 50% refund if they withdraw before next Wednesday. The individual is advised to keep the course Science and Technology studies as it may have similarities to computer science, but the first two courses do not.
  • #1
General_Sax
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Because I'm transferring programs (Engineering -> CompSci), I may have three withdrawls this term. If I explain that the withdrawls are because of this program transfer, the admissions committee will most-likely understand right?

I don't enjoy these courses and the courses will not be program requirements, so why subject myself to them?

P.S. my gpa is 3.5 (overall)
 
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  • #2
Are you still considered a full-time student when you apply the withdrawals? Also, do the withdrawals appear on your transcript? Do you have to withdraw these courses now or can you do it after you get accepted to the other program?

In any case, I personally wouldn't care if you withdrew those courses. However, if there's some similarities between computer science and the engineering that you were in, they might get uneasy and you might want to just finish the courses. But if they're as similar as literature and mathematics, I wouldn't see them getting mad.
 
  • #3
1) I'll be considered a full-time student

2) The withdrawals will appear on my transcript.

3) I don't have to withdraw from these courses


The courses I'm withdrawing from are:

Chemical Process Analysis

Engineering Thermodynamics

Science and Technology studies

I'll also be able to get a 50% refund for these courses if I withdrawal from them before next Wednesday.
 
  • #4
The first two courses you listed don't really have anything to do with computer science. The third one though would probably be good to keep.
 
  • #5


I understand the importance of making informed decisions and pursuing what aligns with your interests and goals. It is understandable that you may have to withdraw from certain courses due to your program transfer from Engineering to Computer Science. In your graduate school applications, it is important to provide an explanation for these withdrawals and how they relate to your program transfer. Admissions committees are typically understanding of such circumstances and will take into consideration your overall GPA of 3.5. It is also important to highlight your passion and aptitude for Computer Science in your application to demonstrate your commitment to the field. Ultimately, it is important to prioritize your academic pursuits and choose courses that will best support your future goals. Best of luck with your graduate school applications.
 

What are withdrawals and how do they affect grad school applications?

Withdrawals refer to dropping a course or courses from your academic record. This can potentially affect your grad school applications if it results in a lower GPA or if it raises concerns about your academic performance. However, a few withdrawals are not likely to significantly impact your overall application.

Will withdrawals hurt my chances of getting into grad school?

It depends on the number of withdrawals and the reasons behind them. If you have a few withdrawals due to valid reasons such as health issues or family emergencies, it is unlikely to significantly hurt your chances. However, if you have a pattern of withdrawing from courses or a high number of withdrawals, it may raise concerns about your ability to handle rigorous academic coursework.

Do I need to explain my withdrawals in my grad school application?

It is not necessary to explain every withdrawal in your grad school application. However, if there are any extenuating circumstances that led to the withdrawals, it may be helpful to provide a brief explanation in your personal statement or addendum.

Can I retake courses to improve my chances of getting into grad school?

Retaking courses to improve your GPA is a common strategy for students applying to grad school. However, it is important to consider the policies of the specific program you are applying to. Some programs may only consider your initial grade, while others may allow you to replace it with the new grade.

How can I address withdrawals in my grad school application?

If you have a few withdrawals on your academic record, you can address them briefly in your personal statement or addendum. It is important to take responsibility for the withdrawals and provide a brief explanation, if applicable. You can also highlight any steps you have taken to prevent future withdrawals, such as improved time management skills or seeking academic support.

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