Y Gene Domination: Male Progeny or Female Progeny?

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In summary, the sex-determining systems in animals are controlled by flipping genetic switches, which can be influenced by environmental conditions or genetic control. Chromosomes, not genes, determine sex and can differ in size and number. While sex chromosomes are usually fixed, they can change in evolution and there can also be unusual chromosome situations. The Y gene cannot be considered dominant since the XY chromosome pair does not have the same genes.
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physicist007
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When the genotype of zygote is heterozygous XY then it results into a male progeny while to obtain a female progeny homozygous XX conditions are needed. Although homozygous YY condition is not possible in nature, but can we say that Y gene seems dominant??
 
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physicist007 said:
When the genotype of zygote is heterozygous XY then it results into a male progeny while to obtain a female progeny homozygous XX conditions are needed. Although homozygous YY condition is not possible in nature, but can we say that Y gene seems dominant??
Those are chromosomes, not genes, right?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Y_chromosome
 
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Sex determining systems in animals work by flipping particular genetic switches (activating genes usually) which result in a cascade of events leading to the differentiation of an individual into one gene or another. The molecular genetics of many of these have been worked out in great detail.
The initial flipping of the "master" switch can result from:
particular environmental conditions (like temperature in alligators),
experimental manipulations,
or the counts of numbers of particular genes (genetic control).

Genetic controls like this can make use of particular genes on non-sex chromosomes, or on sex chromosomes (chromosomes that appear different from each other). Chromosomes are very large pieces of DNA which (often) carry many genes on them.
Sex chromosome systems have a homogametic and a heterogametic sex. The homogametic sex has two copies of the same kind of chromosome (like the XX in mammalian females), The heterogametic sex is the one with two different sex chromosomes (like XY in mammalian males). It can be the other way around, like in birds but the chromosomes are named Z and W and the female is ZW while the male is ZZ (maybe the Brits would say "double Zed").

Surprisingly, which chromosome is determinative can change in evolution. Recently, it has been demonstrated that genetic lines of zebrafish (AB and Tübingen) picked up and fixed (only genes in the breeding population) significant sex determining genes mutations (probably when they were first generated from a small number of animals). Nevertheless, they still were able to make males and females, but not in predictable ratios.

Platies and swordfish (of the genus Xiphophorus) have changed their sex chromosomes during their complicated evolution (lots of crossing between different species).

There can also be weird and unusual (but natural) chromosome situations like YY or XXX. But they are not common.
 
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physicist007 said:
Although homozygous YY condition is not possible in nature, but can we say that Y gene seems dominant??

To be dominant, don't you need a pair of chromosomes with different alleles for the same gene? That wouldn't apply to the XY chromosome pair since they don't have the same genes.
 
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Related to Y Gene Domination: Male Progeny or Female Progeny?

1. What is Y gene domination?

Y gene domination, also known as Y-linked inheritance, refers to the pattern of inheritance where certain traits or characteristics are determined by genes located on the Y chromosome. This means that these traits are passed down from father to son.

2. How does Y gene domination affect progeny?

Y gene domination only affects male progeny, as the Y chromosome is only present in males. This means that traits or characteristics determined by Y-linked genes will only be expressed in male offspring.

3. Can Y gene dominate traits be inherited by females?

No, since females do not have a Y chromosome, they cannot inherit traits or characteristics determined by Y-linked genes. However, females can still carry Y-linked genes and pass them on to their male offspring.

4. What are some examples of traits controlled by Y gene domination?

Some examples include male-specific traits such as facial hair growth, deep voice, and certain types of baldness. Y-linked genes can also determine some disorders or diseases, such as hemophilia and color blindness.

5. Is Y gene domination the only way traits are inherited?

No, there are other patterns of inheritance, such as autosomal dominant and recessive, which involve genes located on the non-sex chromosomes. Additionally, environmental factors and interactions between multiple genes can also influence the expression of traits.

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