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A question about constant velocity/constant acceleration graphs?

  1. Mar 28, 2010 #1
    Hey! For a lab, I have to make a few graphs, I just need some clarification.

    Please correct me if I'm wrong.

    For a D-T graph, where velocity is constant, the line will be straight. (Diagonal.)
    For a V-T graph, where velocity is constant, the line will be straight. (Horizontal)
    ^ Confused about this though, at point 0 what will the y value be? :eek: (For example, if the velocity is 3m/s)
    For a A-T graph, where velocity is constant, there will be NO line. (No acceleration)


    For a D-T graph, where acceleration is constant, the line will be curved.
    For a V-T graph, where acceleration is constant, the line will be straight. (Diagonal)
    For a A-T graph, where acceleration is constant, the line will be straight. (Horizontal)??
    ^ For this one I am also confused.

    I just need to know if I'm on the right track! :blushing:
    Ones in bold are the one I'm not sure are correct.

    Thank you very much for reading! I appreciate any help that is offered. =)
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 29, 2010 #2
    The horizontal line will be above the horizontal axis at a distance equal to 3m/s on the scale.
    The line will be horizontal and along the axis where a=0.
    The horizontal line will be above the x axis for positive acceleration and below it for negative acceleration.
    You are on the right track.

    This might help
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/scotland/learning/bitesize/higher/physics/mech_matt/analyse_motion_rev1.shtml
     
  4. Mar 30, 2010 #3
    thank you for all your help :)
     
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