A question about university courses

In summary, it's tough to know if this will be too much of a workload at the beginning of your degree, but it's possible to do well if you make the effort.
  • #1
NADH
4
0
I am going into my first year of university in science, it is a general first year and I want to leave the door open to go into either physics(particle) or biochemistry. The courses I took are general chemistry, biology, integral and differential calculus, linear algebra and finally physics. Does this seem like too much of a work load, or will this be good to allow me to find which truly peeks my interests?

Thanks for your advice in advance.
 
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  • #2
Three science in different subjects and two math classes? I think it's going to be very rough for you.
 
  • #3
It's certainly possible, and most physics majors end up taking about this number of physics/math classes towards the end of their undergraduate degree. The only issue here is that it's your first semester. There's really no way to tell how you'll react to the workload and whatnot unless you try it. So give it a go, but do not be afraid to drop a class and/or switch to a more liberal arts requirement or something like that. Don't go thinking that dropping a class automatically means you're a bad scientist or will never get into graduate school.
 
  • #4
It's true that physics majors often take three physics classes and two math classes at the same time, but this isn't three physics classes. It's a general chemistry class, a biology class, and a physics class. There is little to no reinforcement of principles between these fields, at least at the freshman level. Believe me, I did physics, chemistry, and calculus in the same semester -- twice -- and it's pain.
 
  • #5
So do you think it would make sense to drop linear algebra and take a course like psychology? If I don't take it will i still be eligible to major in physics if I decide to go that route?
 
  • #6
I took physics, chemistry, calculus, biology, and an arts elective both semesters last year (freshman year) and it wasn't bad at all. In fact, even the biology majors at my university take all three science courses, calculus, and an elective (although they do take a less intensive physics).

If it's possible you could postpone one of the sciences until the summer if you feel the course load might be to much, but I say give it a try. Or drop linear algebra until the summer or 2nd year.
 
  • #7
I would drop one of the sciences before linear algebra. One thing you could do is drop biology and take it next semester while waiting to take the second chemistry class another semester. Psychology, by the way, is an investment of time in itself, but much less so than another lab-based freshman course (as I'm assuming yours all are).
 
  • #8
The problem with that is the university recommends taking all three science courses in order to allow you to go into most majors, and yes they all have lab components. I phoned the university and asked them if it seemed like too much of a course load and they said that a lot of other people are doing it, but I just want more feedback than that. I think if I was to drop one it would be linear algebra though.
 
  • #9
That's a standard first-year workload for someone in the sciences.

I wouldn't worry about courseload issues unless:
(a) you're considering overloading,
(b) you're balancing your studies with working/volunteering/training more than 10 hours per peek,
(c) you have a disability, or
(d) you have medical or social issues that eat up time.

You'll have to work hard, of course, if you want to do well.
 
  • #10
Would you recommend keeping linear algebra as well than, and like said before if it does become too hard swap that with another elective?
 
  • #11
If you have a no-penalty drop period take all the classes you want but be sure you finalize your schedule before the deadline.

I always sign up for an extra course, and rarely drop it if I believe the combined load will be too much for me. At my school though, there is absolutely no penalty for this type of withdraw.
 
  • #12
Yes, definitely make sure it's acceptable to drop. In Texas at least, six drops means you're out of higher education.
 

Related to A question about university courses

1. What types of university courses are available?

There are a wide variety of university courses available, including undergraduate, graduate, and professional programs. Some common types of courses include liberal arts, STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics), business, and health sciences.

2. How do I choose the right university course for me?

Choosing the right university course depends on your interests, career goals, and personal strengths. You can research different programs, talk to academic advisors, and consider your long-term career prospects before making a decision.

3. How long does it take to complete a university course?

The duration of a university course can vary depending on the type of program and the institution. Generally, undergraduate programs take 3-4 years to complete, while graduate programs can take 1-2 years. Professional programs, such as law or medicine, may take longer.

4. Can I change my university course after starting?

Yes, it is possible to change your university course after starting. However, this may require additional time and coursework to complete the new program. It's important to carefully consider your options and consult with academic advisors before making a decision.

5. What are the benefits of studying a university course?

Studying a university course can lead to personal and professional growth, as well as improved job prospects and higher earning potential. Additionally, university courses provide opportunities to develop critical thinking, communication, and problem-solving skills that are valuable in any career.

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