A relation to Le-chatelier's principle?

In summary, the equation ##Fe+2HCl(g) \longrightarrow FeCl_2+H_2## liberates ##H_2##, preventing the formation of ##FeCl_3##. This is due to the Le-Chatelier principle, as the reaction equilibrium is shifted towards the products when product is removed. Additionally, there may be an alternate route for the reaction to produce ##FeCl_3##, but it is neglected when the equilibrium is shifted towards the products of the main route. This preference for ##FeCl_2## formation may also be due to the stability of ##Fe^{+2}##.
  • #1
mooncrater
217
18

Homework Statement


We know about the equation:
##Fe+2HCl(g) \longrightarrow FeCl_2+H_2##. In my textbook it's written that liberation of ##H_2## prevents formation of ##FeCl_3##.
But why?And how?

Homework Equations

The Attempt at a Solution


I think it is related to the Le-Chatelier principle . As ##H_2## is liberated more, the reaction equilibrium is shifted towards the products . So more ##FeCl_2## will be produced. But for ##FeCl_3##, I think there should be an alternative path for the reactants to produce ##FeCl_3## along with the path producing ##FeCl_2## and ##H_2##. I think this path is neglected when the reaction equilibrium is shifted towards the products of the other path.Am I correct , or is there any other reason for that?
 
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  • #2
I think you're right. As you take away product, more product is formed. As far as an alternate route goes, the reaction could go Fe + 3HCL = FeCl3 + 3/2H2. If you are constantly taking away H2 then the reaction should constantly be shifting to the right and keeping the FeCl3 from forming.
 
  • #3
leafjerky said:
I think you're right. As you take away product, more product is formed. As far as an alternate route goes, the reaction could go Fe + 3HCL = FeCl3 + 3/2H2. If you are constantly taking away H2 then the reaction should constantly be shifting to the right and keeping the FeCl3 from forming.
I think the reaction I am talking about forms ##FeCl_2## not## FeCl_3##.
Though ##H_2## is liberated in both the reactions why ##FeCl_2## formation is preferred? Is it due to the reason that ##Fe^{+2}## is the most stable o. S. Of ##Fe##. I am leaving the Le-chatelier approach, as it is working for both
 

Related to A relation to Le-chatelier's principle?

1. What is Le Chatelier's principle?

Le Chatelier's principle is a fundamental concept in chemistry that states that when a system in equilibrium is subjected to a stress, the system will adjust in a way that minimizes the effect of the stress.

2. How does Le Chatelier's principle apply to chemical reactions?

In chemical reactions, Le Chatelier's principle can be used to predict how the equilibrium of the reaction will shift in response to changes in temperature, pressure, or concentration of reactants or products. This can help us understand and control the conditions under which a reaction will occur.

3. What are some real-life examples of Le Chatelier's principle?

One example of Le Chatelier's principle in action is the production of ammonia through the Haber process. By manipulating the temperature, pressure, and concentration of reactants, chemists can optimize the production of ammonia in this reaction.

Another example is the buffering system in our blood, which uses Le Chatelier's principle to maintain a stable pH level in the body.

4. How can we use Le Chatelier's principle to manipulate chemical equilibria?

We can use Le Chatelier's principle to manipulate chemical equilibria by changing the conditions of the system. For example, by increasing the concentration of reactants, we can shift the equilibrium towards the products. By decreasing the temperature, we can shift the equilibrium towards the reactants.

5. What are the limitations of Le Chatelier's principle?

While Le Chatelier's principle is a useful tool for predicting the behavior of chemical reactions, it is not a universal law and there are some limitations. For example, it does not apply to reactions that are not in equilibrium, or to reactions that involve changes in the number of moles of gas. It also cannot predict the extent of the shift in equilibrium, only the direction of the shift.

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