A way to separate the components of a solution?

somasimple

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Is there a simple,fast but pasqsve way to separate ions from a solution?
Hi all,

A solution contains ions, positive and negative ones (i.e k+ cl-).
Is there a simple but passive way (without adding any kind of energy) to separate by exemple the potassium ions from the solution?
(IMHO, I do not think so)
 

Borek

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You are probably on the right track, but question is ambiguous, so it is hard to give an unambiguous answer. if you leave the KCl solution in an open vessel for long enough, you'll get the KCl separated "passively".
 

BvU

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without adding any kind of energy
The ions are in solution because they like it there (it's energetically favourable) . So somehow you need work (=energy) to get them out of their comfort zone !

You are also talking of electric charge separation: no can do without work.
 

symbolipoint

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Not exactly clear, and my own knowledge is now very much weakened, but maybe you are hoping for Ion Exchange Chromatography? Or, are you maybe interested if for chloride, to force it to be precipitated with something and then separated through filtration?
 

somasimple

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Borek said:
You are probably on the right track, but question is ambiguous, so it is hard to give an unambiguous answer. if you leave the KCl solution in an open vessel for long enough, you'll get the KCl separated "passively".
Evaporation does not separate positive from negative ones: I'll get a neutral salt.
BvU said:
The ions are in solution because they like it there (it's energetically favourable) . So somehow you need work (=energy) to get them out of their comfort zone !

You are also talking of electric charge separation: no can do without work.
That is the second part of your reply I'm focused on:
It's like a separation of mater, removing positive ions becomes harder and harder because every time I remove a positive the remaining solution becomes more negative and attracts more and more the positive ?

Is there a chemilcal law/rules that explains it?
 

BvU

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No. It's all physics :smile: electrostatics, energy, entropy, thermodynamics. Physical chemistry at best.
 

somasimple

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No. It's all physics :smile: electrostatics, energy, entropy, thermodynamics. Physical chemistry at best.
I have nothing against Physics, too.
I suppose it comes from something against electroneutrality?
 

Borek

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You want to separate ions? Try to calculate force with which 1 mole of K+ attracts one mole of Cl+ if separated by 1 meter.
 
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