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Accelerating protons and antiprotons for pair production?

  1. May 15, 2015 #1
    Okay so I have a problem with what my text book is saying.

    It defined pair production as a process in which a photon of electromagnetic energy is converted to a pair of particles.

    But then it gave the discovery of an antiproton. Which was when a proton was accelerated to 6MeV and collided into a stationary proton, making one antiproton and 3 protons.

    So, does this p + p --> p + p + antip process count as pair production? In which case, would the definition of pair production be a bit different?

    Also, I found a website on which it says that ''sometimes, a pair of particles annihilates, but then the photon produces another pair of particles.'' When it comes the the first line, is this basically when a pair annihilates, but then the photon still has a lot of energy due to the extra kinetic energy of the particle and its antiparticle, meaning that when it passes close to a nucleus?

    Edit: It also says that a antip + p = n + antin Is this besically an example of what I just wrote above (particles annihilate but then the photon produces another pair of particles)?

    Sorry for lots of questions and thank you for your time.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 15, 2015 #2

    Vanadium 50

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    Does that conserve charge?
     
  4. May 16, 2015 #3
    oooo whoops it's p + p --> p + p + p + antip and well it doesn't look like it does conserve charge, but what has that got to do with anything? Says here it does happen so im not trying to disprove it?
     
    Last edited: May 16, 2015
  5. May 16, 2015 #4

    Vanadium 50

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    Charge is always conserved. If you write down a reaction that doesn't, it's wrong.
     
  6. May 16, 2015 #5
    Well yes I know but charge is conserved here. I just wrote the wrong equation by accident.
     
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