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Acceleration 1-N force to 1-kg object

  1. Nov 16, 2009 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data

    What acceleration can a 1-N force give to a 1-kg object?

    2. Relevant equations



    3. The attempt at a solution
    No clue how to attempt it. I'm an 8th grade science student. you need at least .1021 to move the object
     
    Last edited: Nov 16, 2009
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 16, 2009 #2

    PhanthomJay

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    Assuming the 1 N force is a net force applied to the 1 kg mass, you need to use Newton's 2nd Law to find the acceleration. Do you know it?
     
  4. Nov 16, 2009 #3
    Is it F=ma?
     
  5. Nov 16, 2009 #4
    would that mean I need f/m=a to solve?
     
  6. Nov 16, 2009 #5

    PhanthomJay

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    Yes, good job!
     
  7. Nov 16, 2009 #6
    Is the acceleration 9.80? 1/.102=9.80 m/sec/sec???
     
  8. Nov 16, 2009 #7
    Thank you for your help
     
  9. Nov 16, 2009 #8

    PhanthomJay

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    No, check out your algebra and basic knowledge of Physics. If a=f/m, and f=1 N and m= 1 kg, then a =??? I think you're confusing mass with weight. They are not the same.
     
  10. May 14, 2010 #9
    i have some question like this can u try to help me too..
     
  11. May 14, 2010 #10
    if the mass is 1g and the force is 1dyn what is the acceleration..pls give me 1 example..tnx
     
  12. May 14, 2010 #11

    Cyosis

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    This is a somewhat old thread, it would normally be best to make a new one with your problem. That said, you have the exact same problem as the OP had, just that you're using different units. Remember 1 dyn= 1 g cm/s^2.
     
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