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Acceleration field, velocity field, pressure field

  1. Apr 30, 2017 #1
    I am not familiar with concepts of accelaration field, velocity field, pressure field. I have come up with them in the topic of fluid mechnanics called fluild kinematics. My mathematical background is poor. I would like to learn some information about this concepts. Surely they are mathematical concepts. What part of mathematics do they belong to? I think it is Vector Calculus. I will refresh my mathematical background as soon as possible as well.

    Thank you.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 30, 2017 #2

    DrClaude

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    Staff: Mentor

  4. Apr 30, 2017 #3
    Do you know textbooks explaining this topic in most simple way ? What background does this topic require?

    Thank you.
     
  5. May 2, 2017 #4

    DrClaude

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  6. May 2, 2017 #5
    Yes, fluid mechanics texts I think do not cover but mentions this topic with some applications but they are not very instructive. I remember in Stewart Calculus there was an example probably under topic vector analysis but I do not remember chapter or sequence name. It was an example of a wheel as a velocity fields. The velocity vectors were growing when they were going away from the center.

    Thank you.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 8, 2017
  7. May 2, 2017 #6

    boneh3ad

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    I am honestly having a hard time grasping what you are struggling with here. The concept of a field, be it pressure, velocity, acceleration, or anything else, does not require advanced calculus. It is simply some region in space where that quantity is defined (and usually varies) at a variety of points in space. Now, operating on that field is more of a vector calculus topic, but any fluid mechanics text worth its salt will talk about the material derivative, which is the primary tool you need.
     
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