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Acceleration in 2 Dimensions-Vectors and Projectiles

  1. Nov 6, 2011 #1
    1. An airplane is flying with a velocity of (150, 0) m/s. It is accelerated at 8.92 m/s2 in the x direction, and accelerated in negative y direction at 1.21 m/s2. What is the airplane's velocity at t = 3.6 s?


    2. My textbook says this is a relevant equation: average acceleration = change in velocity/change in time.
    ax=change in velocityx/change in time
    ay=change in velocityy/change in time.

    Where vx and vy are the components of velocity.



    3. So, I plugged the knows (time and acceleration) into the equations and got 32.1 m/s and 4.4 m/s. But I knew it was wrong because why would they give (150, 0) m/s?

    How do I solve this problem?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 6, 2011 #2

    Doc Al

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    Staff: Mentor

    You are finding the change in the velocity components. Use Δv = vf - vi.
     
  4. Nov 6, 2011 #3
    Thanks Doc Al. The only issue is that I need two answers. (x,y) m/s.
     
  5. Nov 6, 2011 #4

    Doc Al

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    Staff: Mentor

    And you have two components. What's the initial velocity x-component? y-component?
     
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