Acceleration - Rocket 1d Kinematics

In summary, the spacecraft, Deep Space 1, will increase its velocity by about 19.0 m/s per day by ejecting high-speed argon ions out the rear of the engine.
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Acceleration -- Rocket 1d Kinematics

NASA has developed Deep-Space 1 (DS-1), a spacecraft that is scheduled to rendezvous with the asteroid named 1992 KD (which orbits the sun millions of miles from the earth). The propulsion system of DS-1 works by ejecting high-speed argon ions out the rear of the engine. The engine slowly increases the velocity of DS-1 by about 19.0 m/s per day.

(a) How much time (in days) will it take to increase the velocity of DS-1 by 13000 m/s?
684.21 days

(b) What is the acceleration of DS-1 (in m/s2)?
m/s2

I got the days, but I can't find the acceleration, what am I missing?

I have tried to do 19.0 * 86400 which is how many seconds in one day.. and that doesn't work.. I have tried other things but too many things to list.
 
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  • #2
Kildars said:
I have tried to do 19.0 * 86400 which is how many seconds in one day.. and that doesn't work.. I have tried other things but too many things to list.
Look again at the definition of acceleration. Look at your product. Are they consistent? It's a good habit to keep your units as you work through a problem. It will help you to know when your operations are not correct.
 
  • #3
OlderDan said:
Look again at the definition of acceleration. Look at your product. Are they consistent? It's a good habit to keep your units as you work through a problem. It will help you to know when your operations are not correct.

Average Acceleration is [tex] \Delta x / \Delta t[/tex]

but is this average acceleration?

45 minutes to get these last three figured out ;).
 
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Dan?

I got 15 min :-p
 
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Kildars said:
Average Acceleration is [tex] \Delta x / \Delta t[/tex]

but is this average acceleration?

45 minutes to get these last three figured out ;).
Average Acceleration is [tex] \Delta v / \Delta t[/tex]
In your earlier post, you calculated [tex] \Delta v * \Delta t[/tex]
 
  • #6
Thanks, assignment is past due but I'm still going to try and figure out, I'll just miss this problem, still an A no big deal.
 

What is acceleration?

Acceleration is the rate of change of an object's velocity over time. It is a vector quantity, meaning it has both magnitude and direction. In simpler terms, acceleration measures how much an object's velocity is changing per unit of time.

How is acceleration calculated?

Acceleration is calculated by dividing the change in velocity (final velocity minus initial velocity) by the time it takes for that change to occur. The formula for acceleration is a = (vf - vi) / t, where a is acceleration, vf is final velocity, vi is initial velocity, and t is time.

What is the difference between average acceleration and instantaneous acceleration?

Average acceleration is the overall change in velocity divided by the total time taken, while instantaneous acceleration is the acceleration at a specific moment in time. Average acceleration is a constant value, while instantaneous acceleration can vary as an object's velocity changes.

How does acceleration affect an object's motion?

Acceleration causes an object to either speed up, slow down, or change direction. If an object is accelerating in the same direction as its motion, its speed will increase. If it is accelerating in the opposite direction of its motion, its speed will decrease. If it is accelerating perpendicular to its motion, it will change direction but maintain a constant speed.

How is acceleration related to rocket 1D kinematics?

Rocket 1D kinematics is a type of motion that involves only one dimension, specifically along a straight line. Acceleration plays a crucial role in rocket 1D kinematics as it determines how quickly the rocket's velocity changes over time and ultimately affects its motion. Rockets use acceleration to overcome the force of gravity and achieve lift-off.

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