Active aero/active vortex generator?

In summary, the conversation discusses the use of drag and downforce in race cars, specifically the role of vortex generators (vg's) in creating downforce. The question is raised about whether activating vg's in a braking zone, after ramping up the rear diffuser past stall, would create greater downforce. The use of active aero and vortex generators in racing is also mentioned, and the possibility of using them to achieve less drag at high speeds and greater downforce in braking zones. The conversation also touches on the use of aerodynamic devices that can be moved by the driver, such as the F-Duct/RW80 used by the McLaren team in F1. The conversation ends with a request for opinions on the principle of using
  • #1
Iceracer33
So, drag vs downforce on race cars is the equation.
We all know vg's will help airplanes from stalling by keeping the air attached past the point of stall. At stall the air has no (?) major drag? (This is a question).
So let's say your race car has a flat bottom, front splitter and a rear diffuser, typical right? Let's take the rear diffuser and make it ramp up past stall (reduce downforce and drag because it is past stall) and then activate vg's in a braking zone which deploy in front of the rear diffuser (yes, under the car)... the air will then attach and create greater downforce (another question)?
Active aero is not new but most cars don't play with stall and vortex generators. Good idea, bad idea... tell me what you think.

My opinion: I believe if you put your diffuser at stall you'll achieve less drag at high speed and then activate the "active vortex generators" to create greater downforce in braking zones, this to me makes sense.
Please don't get lost in how to make them (that's not hard) I am more interested in the principle of it working or not. Balance would be an issue too, yes I know... will it work in principal?
 
Last edited by a moderator:
Engineering news on Phys.org
  • #2
Iceracer33 said:
activate vg's in a braking zone

Most rules ban aerodynamic devices that can be moved by the driver.

Some time ago in F1 the McLaren team found a way around the rule. They used an air duct called the F-Duct/RW80 to stall/un-stall the rear wing. The air flow in the duct was controlled by the driver sticking his knee into the duct to block the flow...

More here..
http://www.formula1-dictionary.net/f_duct.html
 

Related to Active aero/active vortex generator?

1. What is an active aero/active vortex generator?

An active aero/active vortex generator is a technology used in aircraft and automobiles to manipulate the airflow around the body of the vehicle. It consists of small devices that can be controlled to generate vortices or swirls in the airflow, which can improve the overall aerodynamic performance of the vehicle.

2. How does an active aero/active vortex generator work?

An active aero/active vortex generator works by creating vortices in the airflow around the vehicle. These vortices help to control the flow of air, reducing drag and improving stability. The generators are controlled by sensors that detect changes in airflow and adjust the vortices accordingly.

3. What are the benefits of using active aero/active vortex generators?

Active aero/active vortex generators can provide several benefits, including improved aerodynamic efficiency, increased stability and control, and reduced fuel consumption. They can also help to reduce noise and improve overall vehicle performance.

4. Are there any drawbacks to using active aero/active vortex generators?

One potential drawback of using active aero/active vortex generators is the added weight and complexity they can bring to a vehicle. They also require additional power to operate, which can lead to decreased fuel efficiency. Some designs may also be prone to mechanical failures.

5. How is active aero/active vortex generator technology being used in the aerospace industry?

Active aero/active vortex generator technology is being used in the aerospace industry to improve the performance of aircraft. It is being incorporated into wing designs to reduce drag and increase lift, resulting in more efficient and stable flight. It is also being used in the development of next-generation aircraft designs, such as the flying wing concept, to optimize aerodynamics and reduce fuel consumption.

Similar threads

  • Mechanical Engineering
Replies
5
Views
3K
  • Mechanical Engineering
Replies
11
Views
5K
Replies
8
Views
3K
  • Mechanical Engineering
Replies
1
Views
1K
  • Mechanical Engineering
Replies
5
Views
7K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
501
  • Mechanics
Replies
20
Views
2K
  • Mechanical Engineering
2
Replies
43
Views
4K
Replies
2
Views
1K
  • Mechanical Engineering
2
Replies
43
Views
13K
Back
Top