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Adobe Image deblurring sneak

  1. Oct 18, 2011 #1
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 18, 2011
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 18, 2011 #2

    turbo

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    Re: Image deblurring sneak

    Wow!
     
  4. Oct 18, 2011 #3

    Evo

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    Re: Image deblurring sneak

    Question is when will it be out? I bought Photoshop for Spawn eonas ago, cost me a fortune. I'll bet she lost it, it was cool even back then.
     
  5. Oct 18, 2011 #4

    turbo

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    Re: Image deblurring sneak

    Every new release costs a fortune, and if you pay for upgrades, you'll still pay the same over time. Staying on the bleeding edge is quite expensive.
     
  6. Oct 18, 2011 #5
    Re: Image deblurring sneak

    Right, here are the current prices. Some elementary photo editing can also be done with freeware like Gimp
     
  7. Oct 18, 2011 #6
    Re: Image deblurring sneak

    i think so. it won't work for something out of focus, but with a motion blur, there is not so much loss of information. when i took an image processing course back in the mid-90s, we went over blur algorithms. the thing i don't remember from back then is this innovation they've added, which is to calculate the trajectory of the CCD without knowing it prior (say from a flyover, where it would be essentially a straight line). guessing the trajectory is pretty impressive, assuming that is what is being done. hopefully it's not an exhaustive search algorithm that simply computes the trajectory when it's done (like maybe using a sharpness-measuring algorithm to find an endpoint).
     
  8. Oct 18, 2011 #7

    Borek

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    Re: Image deblurring sneak

    Funny, just about an hour ago Junior sent me this link: http://vimeo.com/28962540

    Not from Adobe, but impressive picture related technology.
     
  9. Oct 18, 2011 #8

    rcgldr

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    I noticed the algortihm plots motion. This would seem to imply that the camera involved didn't take the picture all at once, but scanned the ccd's to capture the image in a sequential but moderaly fast sequence, the equivalent of a moving shutter. Do all digital cameras work this way (effective moving shutter) or do some of them sample or at least capture light on all the ccd's at once?
     
  10. Oct 18, 2011 #9

    Borek

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    I am not sure what you mean, but you can read the motion from the picture taken all at once:

    marcin_curves.jpg

    This was shot by manually moving camera with the open shutter.
     
  11. Oct 18, 2011 #10
    not sure about the sequential part (don't think so), but each pixel is integrating photon strikes while the shutter is open.

    http://www.google.com/search?q=remo...s=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a

    "removal of blur caused by uniform linear motion" is a standard technique in Gonzalez/Woods' https://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0201508036/efgscomputlab"
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 26, 2017
  12. Oct 18, 2011 #11

    AlephZero

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    None of this is "magic". Here's one way to do the math - at least, there are enough clues to figure out how to do it, if you know some general image processing theory:
    http://www.mathworks.co.uk/help/toolbox/images/bqqhld4.html [Broken]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 5, 2017
  13. Oct 18, 2011 #12

    Andy Resnick

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  14. Oct 18, 2011 #13

    AlephZero

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    "Cheap" cameras use CMOS sensors where the electronics creates a "rolling shutter" scan, which is cheaper to implement. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rolling_shutter for extreme examples of the distortion it can create.

    It is possible to build a more complex CMOS sensor that scans multiple rows of pixels in parallel, and CCDs intrinsically work in parallel. CCDs need a physical shutter (as in a DSLR) to control the exposure, but for CMOS sensors the "exposure time" for each pixel is controlled electronically.
     
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